Editor's note

Our political decisions have Earth-wide implications
Our political decisions have Earth-wide implications
The facts are in. Now we have to decide what to do about them.
Marginalized and houseless in the West
The movements produced by rural white scorn
The movements produced by rural white scorn
From the Bundys to the State of Jefferson, resentment from disempowered white communities is growing.
Look who’s in the conflict business now
A rising number of Westerners are committed to local solutions that benefit both the land and communities
The beauty of the ugly West
Towns like Wamsutter, Wyo., may never be quaint and charming, but they can lay claim to their own rough beauty once a real community takes root
Turning water inside-out
Many Western cities like Sierra Vista, Ariz., were built beside once-beautiful rivers which were overused and then neglected, while the cities looked elsewhere for new water sources to exploit
Commemorate or celebrate?
In this issue of High Country News, four essayists take a thoughtful look at the Lewis and Clark expedition and its impacts – past and present — on Indian America
Waxing and waning in the Modern West
Collaborative conservation may help revive both endangered prairie ecosystems and the struggling farm communities of the Great Plains
Hot Times - Global Warming in the West
Global Warming is showing up in the West, in everything from receding glaciers to shrinking pika habitat
The people who care about HCN
This issue features three pages of letters from readers, weighing in on High Country News’ editorial approach to the Bush administration’s environmental policies
A chance for redemption
The lead essays in this issue find both darkness and hope in the times we live in, and in the reminder that all civilizations – including our own – eventually crumble and fall
Ballot-box democracy
The same kind of "ballot-box planning" that’s been used to control development in small towns like Paonia, Colo., is being manipulated by Wal-Mart in its quest to build more Supercenters in the West
Laboring for the environment
The challenge of restoring one overgrazed, weed-choked pasture is a good example of the kind of work that needs to be done in the West, to the benefit of both workers and the environment
Rednecks and hippies unite!
The small-town politics of a place like Paonia, Colo., are a microcosm of the nation today, revealing deep political divisions and a kind of winner-takes-all arrogance on the part of those in power
The other bottom line
In trading our public servants for government contractors, we're cutting the heart out of a public-trust ethic, and showing there's no faster way to demolish an institution than by parting it out to the lowest bidder.
In search of political dialogue
Our theory that newcomers would, over time, change the political landscape to one more progressive in outlook, needs revision
The great ranch lands sell-off
Environmentalists and ranchers should quit arguing about public-lands grazing and work together with the land trust movement to save the land we all love
A tempered victory
The Gila River Indian Community in Arizona is on the verge of a huge and historic water rights victory, but even the most successful Indian crusades for water are always compromises
Watt turns history on its head
Former Interior Secretary James Watt still sees himself as a victim of environmental "selfish interest groups," conveniently forgetting that he fought against popular conservation laws on behalf of powerful corporations
In conservation contests, there are no slam dunks
The increasing politicization of the courts is creating a hazardous landscape for conservationists, who need to diligently oppose anti-environmental judges
A plan for Spaceship Earth
President Bush’s space initiative will most likely come to nothing, but it reminds us that we need to get our own planet in order before we explore the galaxy
Lost in the wilderness of power politics
The kind of democratic dialogue that creates viable wilderness proposals is impossible in the current wilderness of power politics
Toppling monoliths in Mormon Country
Now that Mormons are debating environmental issues such as draining Lake Powell, it’s high time they looked at overpopulation and the rampant development of Utah’s Wasatch Front