Editor's note

We need a better social contract with wildfire
We need a better social contract with wildfire
The 2017 fire season has made it clear our current policies don’t work.
How do states treat the lands they own?
How do states treat the lands they own?
An investigation into state land management, to better understand what’s at stake in federal land transfers.
Solace and perspective in writings about the West
Solace and perspective in writings about the West
Western authors offer different lenses through which to understand our region.
The revolution will not be televised
It’s a good thing leadership is emerging in the West on energy issues, because President Bush’s energy plan is a step in the wrong direction
On the trail of global warming
This winter’s weird weather has everybody talking, but nobody wants to tackle the big question: Is global warming finally hitting the West?
Grazing buyouts help land and ranchers
Some Western ranchers, fed up with economic problems and other conflicts, are handing over their grazing allotments to conservation groups in exchange for a healthy check
The best-laid plans
It’s high time Arizona realized it’s a desert, and has to share the Colorado River with six other dry Western states
You say you want a railvolution...
Westerners may love their cars, but the region’s rapid growth means that even the most ardent car-lovers have a stake in mass transit, and in Denver’s grand experiment in light rail
Energy without hypocrisy
Natural gas is a wonderful thing, but our need for it does not outweigh our responsibility to the land
An identity crisis, a decade or two late
The recent controversy over "The Death of Environmentalism" illustrates the importance of reaching across the rural West’s cultural divide
Reawakening our wild humanity
Human beings can learn a lot from our wild animal cousins, but we need to pay more attention to them — especially to the ones we flatten on the highways
Who'll stop the rain?
January may have brought rain and snow to parts of the West, but the study of past climates warns us that we still have to learn to live with drought
Buy them some body armor
Like their military compatriots in Iraq, the American civil servants charged with managing our public lands, water and wildlife lack adequate funding, back-up, or the moral support of their higher-ups
Looking outside the box
In this issue, High Country News ventures outside its usual box to look at 10 serious issues facing the West in the next four years
Politics as a winner-takes-all game is a loser
It would be a grave mistake for President Bush to assume that his recent victory gives license for a winner-take-all power grab in the West
New ways to work in the woods
The National Network of Forest Practitioners restores forests and streams while creating sustainable jobs in local communities
Don’t expect Washington to lead the West
The West needs to take charge of its own destiny, and become more than just a political game piece in the presidential election
The conservation hall of fame is too small
The brothers Stewart and Mo Udall are two of the West’s conservation heroes, and their sons, Rep. Tom Udall of New Mexico and Rep. Mark Udall of Colorado, have very large shoes to fill in their own work for the Western landscape
Look who’s in the conflict business now
A rising number of Westerners are committed to local solutions that benefit both the land and communities
The beauty of the ugly West
Towns like Wamsutter, Wyo., may never be quaint and charming, but they can lay claim to their own rough beauty once a real community takes root
Turning water inside-out
Many Western cities like Sierra Vista, Ariz., were built beside once-beautiful rivers which were overused and then neglected, while the cities looked elsewhere for new water sources to exploit
Commemorate or celebrate?
In this issue of High Country News, four essayists take a thoughtful look at the Lewis and Clark expedition and its impacts – past and present — on Indian America
Waxing and waning in the Modern West
Collaborative conservation may help revive both endangered prairie ecosystems and the struggling farm communities of the Great Plains