Colorado

We should recognize the legal rights of rivers
We should recognize the legal rights of rivers
No law gives a river a right to exist; at best, laws protect a river from harm caused by new development.
Latest: The EPA drops mine cleanup proposal
Latest: The EPA drops mine cleanup proposal
Obama-era plan required mining companies to prove they can pay for remediation.
What Trump’s Supreme Court pick holds for Indian Country
What Trump’s Supreme Court pick holds for Indian Country
Neil Gorsuch’s background in Indian law and Western issues could be useful to tribal litigants.
The wet Net
John Orr created his "Coyote Gulch" blog to follow Denver-area politics and Colorado water issues
Homegrown news: Money can't buy it
In an introduction to this special issue celebrating independent media, High Country News associate editor Jonathan Thompson recalls the exciting, exhausting, high-caffeine years he spent publishing his own newspaper in a small mountain town
From the ground up
The Crested Butte News, a successful independent newspaper in a small Rocky Mountain town, has come full circle and is once again owned by a chain
The memory of mountains
The author remembers a long-ago hike up Pikes Pike with her mother, who later died having no memory of that hike, or of her daughter.
The Fourth Wave
With uranium prices rising, speculators are looking anew at busted mining towns like Jeffrey City, Wyo., but locals have learned to be skeptical
Nine reasons why a river is good for the soul
A writer on a river trip through canyon country muses on things like sand, rapids, ruins and time, as well as the joy that comes from being outside in the company of family and friends
Safety first
Steve Ficklin is an oil and gas safety inspector for the Bureau of Land Management in western Colorado
There was no green in this Rainbow gathering
A rancher whose grazing permit in Colorado’s Routt National Forest was usurped by this year’s Rainbow Family gathering decries the environmental damage left in its wake
The wild, wild weather
Whatever the cause, the weather in the West this last year has been wild and wacky
The noisy democracy of the West
The revised edition of Peter Decker’s Old Fences, New Neighbors examines the changes that population growth has brought to remote Ouray County in western Colorado
The Latest Bounce
Libby, Mont., asbestos victims now eligible for disability; new wind-power farm to come to Colorado; New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson petitions to protect his state’s roadless lands
'Miss Fish Hatchery'
Wildlife conservation biologist Jenn Logan has a soft spot for the less-glamorous endangered species like razorback suckers and boreal toads
On a wing and a prayer
The Gunnison sage grouse has been denied endangered species protection, and biologists like Clait Braun fear the species may be doomed
Dust and Snow
In Colorado’s San Juan Mountains, Tom Painter and other scientists study the dust in the snow and ponder its implications for future drought and weather conditions, especially in the era of global warming
Nostalgia is a moving target
Curmudgeons like Jim Stiles – owner/editor of Moab’s Canyon Country Zephyr – have a lot to teach us about why it is so important for us to cling to the West that we love
Norton eases road claims
Outgoing Interior Secretary Gale Norton has opened the door for counties and states to claim control of roads crossing federal lands
Is everyone a Realtor?
Realtors seem to be everywhere in the West today – including community politics
Painting for progress
Artist Joan Hoffman pours her love of wilderness into her paintings, and uses her art as a way to fight for the environment
The next boomtown
The discovery of heretofore "undiscovered" small towns, and their invasion by wealthy second-homeowners, brings money, problems and often disillusionment to much of the West
The Latest Bounce
White Pine County, Nev., seeks federal help to fight Las Vegas groundwater grab; fired workers suddenly regain jobs at National Renewable Energy Laboratory; marijuana is Washington’s No. 8 agricultural product