Climate Change

Latest: California’s tree die-off is bigger than you thought
Latest: California’s tree die-off is bigger than you thought
An additional 36 million trees have died since May.
Obama’s rush to the end
Obama’s rush to the end
Keeping track of rulemaking, policy decisions and other last actions before the Trump administration’s inauguration.
In California caves, a millipede mystery
In California caves, a millipede mystery
A new species in Sequoia National Park reminds scientists of what is yet to be discovered.
Market cooling
California and the West decide to tackle global warming through the market – by buying and selling carbon
Two weeks in the West
Death (and life) in the Sonoran Desert; fire and drought in the Southwest; courts rule against Bush on environmental issues.
Dry to the bone
Despite a relatively snowy winter here in western Colorado, the season itself seems to have shrunk, with spring arriving weeks earlier than it once did in a trend with ominous consequences for the desert Southwest, particularly Phoenix.
Why would a federal agency trash its libraries?
The Environmental Protection Agency’s quiet efforts to dismantle its own technical libraries are likely to hamstring scientific research – and freedom of thought – across the nation, Jeff Ruch warns.
Excremental gains?
Kern County, Calif., is trying to prevent Los Angeles sludge from entering the county, where it is used to fertilize farmland, and the resulting stink is raising all kinds of questions about how we handle human waste
A whole lot of shaking
In his book A Crack in the Edge of the World, Simon Winchester takes a comprehensive look at the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and warns of the geological perils still facing the region
Trees — A different shade of green
Increasingly, Western cities are planting trees to save energy as well as provide beauty
Fire and the warming West
The writer says this summer's wildfires reflect the increasing impacts from drought and global climate change
California steps up to lead the nation
The writer salutes California for taking action on global warming and says that the notion of Western "exceptionalism" is dead
Reborn
With global warming an increasing threat, some are urging a return to nuclear energy, but the industry’s own checkered past reminds us that a nuclear renaissance will be neither easy nor cheap
Where there's fire, there's global warming
Climate scientist Anthony Westerling is working to illuminate the connection between rising global temperatures and the increasing ferocity of the West’s forest fires
The good news about garbage
The writer teaches herself a humbling chore — cleaning up other people's garbage
Climate-change clues — in tropical glaciers
In Thin Ice: Unlocking the Secrets of Climate in the World’s Highest Mountain Ranges, mountain climber and physicist Mark Bowen follows researchers who are finding clues to climate change in high-altitude tropical glaciers
The wild, wild weather
Whatever the cause, the weather in the West this last year has been wild and wacky
The Tamarisk Hunter
The Tamarisk Hunter
In the desert Southwest of 2030 Big Daddy Drought runs the show, California claims all the water, and a water tick named Lolo ekes out a rugged living removing tamarisk.
The hazy days of summer ... and winter, spring and fall
With the Interior West’s national parks facing an increase in haze and air pollution, Rocky Mountain National Park is working with government agencies to improve air quality
HCN looks to the future
In a special summer reading issue, HCN dishes up a science fiction story that imagines life in the Southwest in 2030 or so, when "Big Daddy Drought" is in full stride, and California claims all water
Tribes look to cash in with 'tree-market' environmentalism
The Nez Perce Tribe is trying to combat global warming – and make a few bucks – by planting trees for carbon dioxide sequestration
Science vs. science fiction — get it straight
The decision of the Association of Petroleum Geologists to give novelist Michael Crichton its "Journalist of the Year" award for his anti-global warming thriller State of Fear can only increase public cynicism about science and scientists
Dust and Snow
In Colorado’s San Juan Mountains, Tom Painter and other scientists study the dust in the snow and ponder its implications for future drought and weather conditions, especially in the era of global warming