Books

The captivating magic of a dry, dusty text
The captivating magic of a dry, dusty text
An encyclopedia-style book published in 1933 offers surprising perspective.
More books essential to understanding the American West
More books essential to understanding the American West
Readers tell us their favorites from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.
Terry Tempest Williams and the refuge of change
Terry Tempest Williams and the refuge of change
One of the West’s most beloved authors revisits Great Salt Lake.
See the vanishing rest stops of the American West
See the vanishing rest stops of the American West
A review of “The Last Stop” and a look at iconic roadside waypoints.
Photos: Underwater wilderness in the Pacific Northwest
Photos: Underwater wilderness in the Pacific Northwest
A review of David Hall’s “Beneath Cold Seas”
The lost in canyon country
The lost in canyon country
A new book recounts the many mysterious disappearances in the Western desert.
“A history of subversion”: An excerpt from Terry Tempest Williams’ latest book
“A history of subversion”: An excerpt from Terry Tempest Williams’ latest book
“César E. Chávez National Monument” from The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks.
Photos: Three years with New Mexico’s Hispanic communities
Photos: Three years with New Mexico’s Hispanic communities
A photographer’s nostalgic look back at time spent with Nuevomexicanos.
Photos: Inside the controversial sport of coyote coursing
Photos: Inside the controversial sport of coyote coursing
This subset of coyote hunting involves trained dogs and is relatively uncommon in the West.
Past and present fauna
Past and present fauna
Writers bear witness to the “Age of Loneliness,” in the midst of a mass extinction.
In a dead-end prison town, a fraught journey home
In a dead-end prison town, a fraught journey home
A first-time novelist follows a quiet Montana man in the wake of grief.
The absurdist Western
The absurdist Western
It’s worth following the twists and turns of Robert Garner McBrearty’s The Western Lonesome Society.
Meet one of the great forgotten Western painters
Meet one of the great forgotten Western painters
Frank Mechau, who died in 1946 at age 42, saw the West through an unusual lens.
A photographer turns his lens on small-town bliss
A photographer turns his lens on small-town bliss
A new exhibit in Denver, Colorado, looks at happiness in the rural West, focusing on Bliss, Idaho.
Menace at the edge of sanctuary
Menace at the edge of sanctuary
In “The Animals,” a wildlife rescuer faces his ugly past.
Where hope lingers like sagebrush on the wind
Where hope lingers like sagebrush on the wind
In his latest collection of Western tales, Percival Everett searches for the good in range life.
Crime and grit: A retrospective collection from the don of Chicano noir
Crime and grit: A retrospective collection from the don of Chicano noir
An uneven but often rewarding collection from one of the West’s masterful storytellers.
Missoula’s rape problem
Missoula’s rape problem
Jon Krakauer’s latest book explores a flawed justice system that fails victims.
In an era of change, a new chapter for the National Park Service
In an era of change, a new chapter for the National Park Service
Two new books offer an invitation to the parks — and an argument for their existence.
The beautiful wilds of national parks
The beautiful wilds of national parks
Review of “The National Parks: An American Legacy,” by Ian Shive.
How the wild Northern Rockies were saved — and who led the way
How the wild Northern Rockies were saved — and who led the way
A new book looks at the ordinary citizens who fought for wilderness designations.
The time of painful impossibilities
The time of painful impossibilities
A reading by U.S. poet laureate Juan Felipe Herrera.
The ‘poisoned landscapes’ we leave behind
The ‘poisoned landscapes’ we leave behind
Q&A with photographer David T. Hanson about his new book, ‘Wilderness to Wasteland,’ which shows a dystopian side of progress.