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  • Wolves still struggle in the Southwest

    Restoring Mexican wolves to the Southwest has met more resistance than the restoration of wolves in the Northern Rockies.

  • 'There isn't much room for more wolves'

    Ralph Maughan, professor of political science at Idaho State University, and president-elect of the Wolf Recovery Foundation, blames conflicts on not enough room in the wild for wolves.

  • 'I respect wolves. I still don't like them killing oursheep.'

    In her own words, Margaret Soulen Hinson explains that wolf predation is minimal compared to other animals that kill her family's sheep.

  • Singing cowboys strike a bad chord

    The Bar-K Wranglers, a group of singing cowboys who planned to open a dinner theater in Oakley, were turned down by the Planning Commission, due to wetlands, moose habitat, and financial questions.

  • Small towns court upscale tourists

    A small, former silver-mining town in the Rockies offers tourists cultural experience with the Creede Repertory Theater, turning the town into a bustling arts community.

  • Indians play power game

    The Fort Mojave Tribe has built the South Point power plant to diversify its economy, partnering with a major energy company and monitoring its environmental performance.

  • Hansen pops a wheelie

    Utah Rep. Jim Hansen has introduced a bill that would allow ATV riders access to 300 miles of existing roads and allow the creation of more access trails for ATVs in Utah.

  • Expatriate fish could return a hero

    The Hofer rainbow trout, a foreign offspring of the Pacific rainbow, may be the answer to the cure for whirling disease, but wildlife managers are concerned about introducing the imported species, fearing it could displace native fish.

  • Raptors won't fry away

    A new agreement by the Fish and Wildlife Service and Minneapolis Xcel Energy could set a precedent for protecting more raptors from electrocution on power lines.

  • Where there's smoke wood, there's less fire

    Working under a special-use cutting permit from the Forest Service, Ed LaRose is harvesting alligator juniper to produce smoke-wood chips and a high profit.

  • We'd like 2,387 salmon and a Pepsi, please

    A report from the National Marine Fisheries Service suggests exact numbers of wild salmon and steelhead needed in each tributary of the Columbia for removal from the endangered species list.

  • Elk conservation group sharpens its ax

    New CEO Rich Lane of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is directed to use corporate-style downsizing of the work force while at the same time build a $22 million new headquarters for the nonprofit.

  • The Latest Bounce

    Steelhead and salmon may be without critical habitat designation; 1872 Mining Law reform; Gateway Communities Cooperation Act proposed; hemp crop planted third year in a row on Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota.

  • Grazing foes float a buyout

    Anti-grazing groups are trying to convince Congress to buy out ranchers' grazing allotments on public land, but resistance on the part of permit holders may stop the effort.

  • Wolf at the door

    Wolves have been restored in the Northern Rockies, but their conflict with civilization now prompts wildlife managers to face some agonizing decisions about the animal's future.

  • Where free trade is more than an acronym

    Pulling onions alongside a Mexican field worker, the writer describes the hard work and meager pay for a product that will sell for 50 times what workers are paid.

  • New monuments: Planning by numbers

    The Interior Department's decision to go ahead and manage the new monuments established by Clinton raises cautious optimism among the environmental fraternity - the caution due to Norton's emphasis on local involvement: miners, grazers and motorheads, for

  • The Old West went that-a-way

    Encouraged by an East Coast editor, the writer gives her outspoken opinion of the "Real West," and the editor turns it down.

  • History's Lesson: Build another Noah's Ark

    Paul Larmer interviews Wildlands Project biologist Michael Soule.

  • New hope for abandoned mines

    U.S. Reps. Mark Udall (D) and Bob Schaffer (R) of Colorado propose an amendment to the Clean Water Act to offer good Samaritans protection from liability in cleaning up abandoned hardrock mines and their polluted streams.

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