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High Country News - Most Recent

  • Life After Old Growth

    The battle over Northwestern old-growth forests is raging again, but behind the scenes, some locals are trying to make peace

  • Death of the San Pedro: Not if, but when

    Groundwater pumping in the Sierra Vista area may be already reducing water flow to the San Pedro River

  • A Thirst for Growth

    In Sierra Vista, Ariz., a partnership of developers, environmentalists and government agencies is trying to keep the San Pedro River alive, while at the same time allowing for continued growth in this burgeoning Sunbelt city

  • 'The environment ... is where we live'

    'The environment ... is where we live'

    A group of determined activists in Mountain View, N.M., fights for environmental justice in a poor and polluted neighborhood.

  • Two weeks in the West

    Western governors go green; King Coal gets hammered; Divine Strake strikes out; Colorado cons on the North Forty; Mother Nature’s bodyguards; Western wagering data; and energy use and Bush approval: a case of eerie symmetry.

  • Have bee, will travel

    This issue of High Country News features Hannah Nordhaus on the challenges facing a Western migratory beekeeper and his hives of pollinating bees.

  • Heard around the West

    Gail Kimbell and the vanishing Forest Service budget; not saying the Pledge in Mesa, Ariz.; racing old beaters in California; talkative men’s rooms; saying it (the Miranda warning, that is) with flowers.

  • The knowledge of mules

    After more than a decade of a solitary existence packing mules in the Northern Rockies, the writer is seriously injured and must reconsider his way of life.

  • A geography of the imagination

    In Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape, edited by Barry Lopez and Debra Gwartney, 45 diverse writers define unusual geographical terms used across the country.

  • Don’t send a check, send yourself

    In an effort to “think globally and act locally,” the author volunteers his time for environmental causes, rather than just reaching for his checkbook.

  • Don’t move a mussel

    Boaters, kayakers, anglers and other recreationists can help stop the spread of quagga mussels and other aquatic invasives by following a few simple rules.

  • Battling over ballast

    Congress has tried to regulate ballast water in ships in order to stop the spread of zebra mussels, but so far loopholes in the law and tussles over policy have made the effort ineffective.

  • A wolf’s life

    The wolf known as B-7 – the last surviving member of a group of Canadian wolves released in Idaho in 1995 – has died.

  • Stream leases languish

    Efforts to privatize instream-flow protection – to keep enough water in rivers and streams to sustain their ecological functions – face tough going in the West.

  • Getting the lead out

    Condor 134’s harrowing experience with lead poisoning exemplifies these endangered birds’ greatest challenge – which some advocates hope to ease by banning lead bullets in California

  • Two weeks in the West

    The Intergovernmental Panel On Climate Change has bad news; Govs. propose global warming legislation; nuclear revival in the wings; Rockies Prosperity Act back in Congress; Arizona may stifle ballot measures; Bush’s budget; the West’s electrical grid.

  • Welcome to the Homogocene

    The rapid spread of invasive species like quagga and zebra mussels could transform the once-isolated and ecologically unique West into just another McDonaldized patch of the planet.

  • Wish You Weren’t Here

    Quagga mussels – an extraordinarily prolific and costly invasive species – have appeared in Lake Mead, and no one is sure how to keep these unwanted newcomers from infesting the West.

  • The Efficiency Paradox

    Water efficiency has long been touted as a silver bullet for the West’s water problems, but too much efficiency can cause problems of its own, especially in the fragile Colorado River Delta.

  • Man Camp

    In Western Colorado, where the energy boom is stretching the resources – and social fabric – of local communities, some companies have turned to portable dormitories to ease the housing crunch.

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