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High Country News - Most Recent

  • Schooling, fish

    Judge Jim Redden is right to push the Bush administration on salmon restoration, but fish may end up faring as poorly in courtrooms as San Francisco’s schoolchildren did after well-intentioned decisions on busing.

  • Salmon Justice

    Judge Jim Redden has given the Bush administration an ultimatum: Submit a viable plan for salmon restoration, or face the possible removal of four dams on the lower Snake River.

  • Heard around the West

    Is it a grolarbear or a pizzly?; garage doors vs. homeland security; hermaphrodite deer; Park Service fees; the drilling rig next door; school buses become billboards in Colorado

  • I fell into a burning ring of fire

    There’s nothing like a campfire to soothe and lift the soul

  • A corps of visitors, not discoverers

    In Lewis and Clark Through Indian Eyes, the late historian Alvin Josephy Jr. has assembled essays by nine Indian writers who examine the Corps of Discovery from the other side of the cultural looking glass

  • Chickens are roosting on private property in Oregon

    Buyer’s remorse is strong in Oregon, where Measure 37 has sparked a developer’s feeding frenzy that has Oregonians’ heads spinning

  • Of salvage logging and salvation

    If we truly want to "salvage" our forests – and the rest of our environment – we need to think beyond salvage logging, and acknowledge that the value of dead trees cannot be measured in board-feet alone

  • Shear Pleasure

    A photo essay follows Matt Smith and the other New Zealanders who make up the company Shear Pleasure as they travel Montana, visiting sheep ranches, shearing sheep, and drinking hard at the end of the day

  • Tequila-fueled tunes

    The music Roger Clyne writes and performs with his band, Roger Clyne and the Peacemakers, is inspired by the Arizona desert

  • Excremental gains?

    Kern County, Calif., is trying to prevent Los Angeles sludge from entering the county, where it is used to fertilize farmland, and the resulting stink is raising all kinds of questions about how we handle human waste

  • Two weeks in the West

    Supreme Court to consider use of mobster law to sue federal employees; water to return to California’s Owens River; Timothy B. Sundles confesses to wolf poisoning; drilling banned on Rocky Mountain Front; Western religion or lack thereof; Christmas tree

  • Slipping into the holidays

    This issue’s cover essay on New Mexico’s gas fields – and our publisher’s adventures during a recent snowstorm in Paonia – reveal the complex links that bind Westerners together for better or worse

  • Confessions of a Methane Floozy

    An environmentalist who owns royalty interest in New Mexico oil and gas wells heads down to the San Juan Basin to talk to rancher Tweeti Blancett, driller Tom Dugan and others about the moral complexities inherent in Americans’ energy use

  • Heard around the West

    True-blue Montana libertarian Stan Jones; neighbors helping neighbors steal cars in Arizona; "vanishing culture" vampires; only one flag allowed in Pahrump, Nev.; tampering with food in New Mexico; and the Forest Service is bipolar

  • Dina's Place

    An 8-year-old named Dina leads the author down to her own "special place" by the Big Sioux River on the Indian reservation that is home to the troubled child

  • The art of an alien landscape

    In Westernness: A Meditation, poet and scholar Alan Williamson examines what it means to live in the West through the eyes of the region’s writers and artists

  • Dancing to Biederbecke in Montana

    In The Willow Field, his first novel, memoirist William Kittredge serves up an old-fashioned potboiler

  • Travels in a sublime wasteland

    In Sunshot: Peril and Wonder in the Grand Desierto, writer Bill Broyles and photographer Michael Berman explore the gritty desert on the U.S.-Mexico borderlands

  • They should shoot horses, shouldn't they?

    Wild horses are not native to the West, and they do not deserve our protection

  • A director from central casting

    Mary Bomar, the brand-new director of the National Park Service, worked her up through the agency’s bureaucracy

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