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  • A geography of the imagination

    In Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape, edited by Barry Lopez and Debra Gwartney, 45 diverse writers define unusual geographical terms used across the country.

  • Don’t send a check, send yourself

    In an effort to “think globally and act locally,” the author volunteers his time for environmental causes, rather than just reaching for his checkbook.

  • Don’t move a mussel

    Boaters, kayakers, anglers and other recreationists can help stop the spread of quagga mussels and other aquatic invasives by following a few simple rules.

  • Battling over ballast

    Congress has tried to regulate ballast water in ships in order to stop the spread of zebra mussels, but so far loopholes in the law and tussles over policy have made the effort ineffective.

  • A wolf’s life

    The wolf known as B-7 – the last surviving member of a group of Canadian wolves released in Idaho in 1995 – has died.

  • Stream leases languish

    Efforts to privatize instream-flow protection – to keep enough water in rivers and streams to sustain their ecological functions – face tough going in the West.

  • Getting the lead out

    Condor 134’s harrowing experience with lead poisoning exemplifies these endangered birds’ greatest challenge – which some advocates hope to ease by banning lead bullets in California

  • Two weeks in the West

    The Intergovernmental Panel On Climate Change has bad news; Govs. propose global warming legislation; nuclear revival in the wings; Rockies Prosperity Act back in Congress; Arizona may stifle ballot measures; Bush’s budget; the West’s electrical grid.

  • Welcome to the Homogocene

    The rapid spread of invasive species like quagga and zebra mussels could transform the once-isolated and ecologically unique West into just another McDonaldized patch of the planet.

  • Wish You Weren’t Here

    Quagga mussels – an extraordinarily prolific and costly invasive species – have appeared in Lake Mead, and no one is sure how to keep these unwanted newcomers from infesting the West.

  • The Efficiency Paradox

    Water efficiency has long been touted as a silver bullet for the West’s water problems, but too much efficiency can cause problems of its own, especially in the fragile Colorado River Delta.

  • Man Camp

    In Western Colorado, where the energy boom is stretching the resources – and social fabric – of local communities, some companies have turned to portable dormitories to ease the housing crunch.

  • Under the radar

    Homeless families aren’t found only in urban areas. They’re also struggling to survive in the rural West, as shown by the story of Barbara Trivitt and her two children, who lived in a Jeep in Coos Bay, Oregon, this fall.

  • The bigger the mine, the better the deal

    Land swaps, like the one planned to save land near Yellowstone National Park from mining, are a bad habit with a bad history in Montana's national forests.

  • Disappearing railroad blues

    The merger of the Union Pacific and Southern Pacific railroads creates a monopoly that may leave some of Colorado and Utah's working towns without rail transport for their coal.

  • Round two for Steens Mountain development

    John and Cindy Witzel want to build a school for outfitters on the 160 acres they own on Oregon's Steens Mountain, an area also being considered for national monument status.

  • Native Waters

    In Native Waters: Contemporary Indian Water Settlements and the Second Treaty Era, scholar Daniel McCool explores the current struggle by tribes to finally get the water they have long been promised by treaty.

  • This land holds a story the church won't tell

    The Mormon Church would like to buy all of Martin's Cove, Wyo., where Mormon pioneers died 146 years ago, but the writer believes the historical site should stay in the hands of the public, so the full story can be told.

  • One Colorado county takes a stand

    Poor but coal-rich Delta County, Colo., made history when its county commissioners, responding to a determined citizens' movement, voted to deny four coalbed methane test wells and attach conditions to the drilling of a fifth.

  • We aimed for Russia and hit the West

    The Atomic Energy Commission deliberately lied about radiation dangers to miners and other Westerners.

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