High Country News - Most Recent

  • Condemned

    In Idaho and Wyoming, old eminent domain laws allow private entities to condemn landowners’ property – as Peter and Judy Riede discovered when J.R. Simplot Co. announced plans to expand its phosphate mine and build a road across their ranch.

  • Two weeks in the West

    Cross-country skiers and snowmobilers clash over access to Logan Canyon, Utah; Mount Jefferson, Mont.; and (of course) Yellowstone; Forest Service Chief Dale Bosworth steps down to be replaced by Gail Kimbell; West becomes player in national politics; bor

  • Dear Friends

    HCN hosts panel discussion in Berkeley about the West’s political future; notes from readers Mark Salvo and Michael Green.

  • Against the current

    For a long time, the West used water as if the supply were endless, but nowadays environmentalists are finding that too much efficiency causes problems of its own, especially in fragile ecosystems like the Colorado River Delta.

  • The Efficiency Paradox

    Water efficiency has long been touted as a silver bullet for the West’s water problems, but too much efficiency can cause problems of its own, especially in the fragile Colorado River Delta.

  • Heard around the West

    Do-it-yourself ski areas; “ecosexuals”; “prescription dog” comes home; Utah’s Radium Stadium; illegal immigrants build fence to keep themselves out; it’s a long way from Sydney, Australia, to Sidney, Mont.

  • The great wilderness compromise

    Both sides of the contentious debate over a proposed Idaho wilderness bill invoke Howard Zahniser, father of the Wilderness Act -- and both sides have a point.

  • How to be #1 in the world and still be a loser

    Giles Slade’s new book, Made to Break: Technology and Obsolescence in America, is a fascinating intellectual history of how marketers demolished the American tradition of thrift.

  • A family of criminals and killers

    In All God’s Children: Inside the Dark and Violent World of Street Families, Rene Denfeld tells the disturbing story of Portland’s teen runaways, charting the path that took one of them, Danielle Marie Cox, from honor student to convicted murderer.

  • Why operation of wildlife refuges shouldn't be privatized

    The debacle on the National Bison Range is a prime example of why the management of wildlife refuges should not be privatized.

  • How the Indians were set up to fail at bison management

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, not the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, is to blame for alleged management problems at the National Bison Range in Montana.

  • Born to be feral

  • The return of the (non) native

  • Maybe they shouldn't shoot them all

  • Winning hearts and minds — in the National Park Service

  • One Christmas gift that won't be returned

  • Just don't toss it in the recycling bin

  • History of a decline

    An illustrated timeline charts the appearance of dams on the lower Snake River and the resulting decline of salmon, along with the so-far-inadequate response of the federal government.

  • Fill 'er up with moonshine

    Chris Myles plans to fuel his vehicles with homebrewed ethanol, made in a still he built at his home in Silverton, Colo.

  • Man Camp

    In Western Colorado, where the energy boom is stretching the resources – and social fabric – of local communities, some companies have turned to portable dormitories to ease the housing crunch.