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High Country News - Current Issue

  • The 'Niche West' reconnects us to the land

    Honest work producing honest goods - not industrial tourism - is the way for Westerners to start a healthy, honest, economic and spiritual relationship with our landscape.

  • Campaign finance reform may boost grass roots

    The campaign finance reform bill sponsored by John McCain and Russell Feingold won't solve everything, but it may give grassroots environmental groups a bit of an edge in future political battles.

  • The Postal Service stamps the mythic West

    Wyoming's fight with Montana over a new Montana stamp that shows a cowboy on a bucking horse shows that the Postal Service has fallen for Western myths that have nothing to do with the states' real characters.

  • Notes from a corporate insider: It's not easy turning green

    The sustainable-business movement, which holds that environmentalism and business can be a winning combination, is not as easy on the ground as it may seem.

  • Winter-use plan lurches toward the finish line

    The National Park Service has issued its Winter-Use Plans Draft Supplemental EIS, the agency's first attempt to manage winter traffic in Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks.

  • Cleaner machines drive (slowly) toward Yellowstone

    The Environmental Protection Agency is developing the first emission standards for off-road motors, including snowmobiles.

  • Snowy plover predators become prey

    On the coast of Oregon, federal agencies have decided to start poisoning and killing the predators that steal the eggs of endangered snowy plovers.

  • A road through a national monument?

    In New Mexico, Albuquerque's new mayor, Martin Chavez, has renewed support for building a controversial road through Petroglyph National Monument.

  • Forest Service gives climbers the slip

    Rock climbers are fuming at the Forest Service's decision to all but outlaw climbing at caves near Bend, Ore., that are sacred to local tribes and also home to dwindling numbers of bats.

  • Wheels still spin after desert lockdown

    Road closures to protect endangered Sonoran pronghorn in Ariz.'s Cabeza Prieta Nat'l Wildlife Refuge and Organ Pipe Cactus Nat'l Monument will keep the public out, but may not stem the tide of drug smugglers, illegal immigrants and Border Patrol agents.

  • Braking development in the Breaks

    Environmentalists are fighting to stop energy development in Montana's Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument.

  • A new world in the woods

    In many Western communities, forest workers are quietly converting their skills from industrial logging to forest restoration.

  • The Latest Bounce

    Nuclear power plant may be built in Idaho; Bruce Babbitt to head international division of Cadiz Inc.; Bonneville Power Administration says salmon will get water this summer; Hanford Nuclear Reservation; CO Rep. Scott McInnis wants single "fire czar."

  • Drought pinches Colorado River reservoirs

    A serious drought in the Colorado River watershed has California and Arizona wondering where the water will come from.

  • Move over! Will snowmobile tourism relax its grip on a gateway town?

    In West Yellowstone, Mont., where snowmobile tourism is a mainstay of the economy, locals are split between fierce supporters of the industry and those who favor a little more quiet and a measure of control.

  • A dusty lake is plumbed halfway back to life

    In an attempt to stem particulate air pollution caused by dust from California's dry Owens Lake, water is being returned to the lake bed for the first time in 90 years.

  • Bush turns BLM into energy machine

    President Bush's brand-new National Energy Office is designed to expedite drilling and mining on public lands.

  • In California, no water project is too big

    An Alaska company's much-mocked plan to haul bags of water 400 miles along the California coast is really no crazier than the things California has come up with in its search for water.

  • Zoning code may squeeze Aspen ranchers

    The few remaining ranchers in Pitkin County, Colo., feel that a rezoning plan intended to concentrate Aspen's growth will end up harming them.

  • Alternative livestock searches for a niche

    After the enthusiastic boosterism that surrounded alternative livestock in the 1980s, emu, ostrich, elk and bison producers have seen the market - and their incomes - plummet.

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