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High Country News - Current Issue

  • Where there's smoke wood, there's less fire

    Working under a special-use cutting permit from the Forest Service, Ed LaRose is harvesting alligator juniper to produce smoke-wood chips and a high profit.

  • We'd like 2,387 salmon and a Pepsi, please

    A report from the National Marine Fisheries Service suggests exact numbers of wild salmon and steelhead needed in each tributary of the Columbia for removal from the endangered species list.

  • Elk conservation group sharpens its ax

    New CEO Rich Lane of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is directed to use corporate-style downsizing of the work force while at the same time build a $22 million new headquarters for the nonprofit.

  • The Latest Bounce

    Steelhead and salmon may be without critical habitat designation; 1872 Mining Law reform; Gateway Communities Cooperation Act proposed; hemp crop planted third year in a row on Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota.

  • Grazing foes float a buyout

    Anti-grazing groups are trying to convince Congress to buy out ranchers' grazing allotments on public land, but resistance on the part of permit holders may stop the effort.

  • Wolf at the door

    Wolves have been restored in the Northern Rockies, but their conflict with civilization now prompts wildlife managers to face some agonizing decisions about the animal's future.

  • Where free trade is more than an acronym

    Pulling onions alongside a Mexican field worker, the writer describes the hard work and meager pay for a product that will sell for 50 times what workers are paid.

  • New monuments: Planning by numbers

    The Interior Department's decision to go ahead and manage the new monuments established by Clinton raises cautious optimism among the environmental fraternity - the caution due to Norton's emphasis on local involvement: miners, grazers and motorheads, for

  • The Old West went that-a-way

    Encouraged by an East Coast editor, the writer gives her outspoken opinion of the "Real West," and the editor turns it down.

  • History's Lesson: Build another Noah's Ark

    Paul Larmer interviews Wildlands Project biologist Michael Soule.

  • New hope for abandoned mines

    U.S. Reps. Mark Udall (D) and Bob Schaffer (R) of Colorado propose an amendment to the Clean Water Act to offer good Samaritans protection from liability in cleaning up abandoned hardrock mines and their polluted streams.

  • Bush takes a swing at community forestry

    Hit hard by reduced federal timber harvests, Pacific Northwest communities now learn that President Bush wants to eliminate the $12.5 million Forest Service budget that would have assisted them with fire season and watershed restoration.

  • Landmark timber deal stops Seattle sprawl

    Overwhelmed by development in this bedroom community near Seattle, the town of Snoqualmie finds an ally in the Evergreen Forest Trust, which has purchased a huge tree farm that will enable logging to continue, and block sprawl.

  • Land board says, 'Look before you lease'

    The rush to develop methane on Wyoming's public lands hits a speed bump as the Department of Interior Board of Land Appeals agrees with environmental groups that the BLM used inadequate studies when issuing leases for coalbed-methane drilling.

  • Energy boom's forward guard stalls out in Utah ... for now

    Developing energy at any cost appears to be the Bush administration's strategy as they send "thumper trucks" into southern Utah to carry out seismic detection of oil deposits.

  • The Latest Bounce

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers puts Columbia River projects on hold after criticism on cost benefits; a 1,465-acre parcel that is part of the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site has been turned over to Indian tribes in Oklahoma; Congress refuses

  • Bison under the gun - again

    Following the killing of 170 bison outside Yellowstone last winter, the Buffalo Field Campaign is suing the Montana Dept. of Livestock and the Forest Service, alleging violations of the Endangered Species Act.

  • Dredging up debate

    Port of Portland officials and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers want to dredge the Columbia River, but a series of articles in The Oregonian reveals major flaws in the plan, resulting in a controversial exchange between dredgers and critics.

  • Spilling salt into rivers

    The Southern Ute Tribe is upset with Colorado state officials for issuing a permit to allow two coalbed-methane wells to spill polluted water into the Florida River, upstream from the tribe.

  • Property rights reined in

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled April 23 that property owners at Lake Tahoe are not entitled to compensation for a moratorium in 1981 on new building that was created to protect Lake Tahoe's blue waters from erosion runoff.

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