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High Country News - Current Issue

  • Salty solution for Bay wildlife

    California's San Francisco Bay may become the site of the country's second-largest coastal wetland restoration project, if all goes according to plan.

  • A landslide suit for salmon

    An Oregon environmental coalition is suing the state saying that 20-foot-wide logging buffers besides streams do little to prevent landslides in salmon habitat.

  • White River Forest plan friend to all - and to none

    The final management plan for Colorado's White River National Forest has conservationists, recreationists and water users all complaining about it.

  • The anatomy of fire

    A visit to the biggest forest fire in Colorado history - the Hayman Fire - and time spent with some of those battling it leads the author to speculate on the mystery and complexity of humanity's relationship with fire.

  • In the lion's eye

    Personal tale of a biologist in southeastern Idaho who had a mountain lion as her guardian during a bout with the flu.

  • Restoring the West, goat by goat

    Lani Lamming of Wyoming leases goats to conscientious landowners who have discovered the benefits of organic weed control.

  • A wide-angled wilderness

    The proposed Wild Sky Wilderness Area northeast of Seattle could be a model for future wilderness designations, based on its diversity of tourism-based opportunities along with good environmental stewardship.

  • Can green-certified lumber make it?

    Some foresters who are using responsible environmental practices in order to be "green-certified" are disappointed by the lack of return for their admirable efforts.

  • Mount Hood recreation may go big time

    Friends of Mount Hood is fighting the Mount Hood Meadows Development Corp., which wants to build a ski resort that threatens pear orchards and cattle ranches on the northeastern flanks of Oregon's Mount Hood.

  • Columbia dredging closer

    The National Marine Fisheries Service has again changed its opinion and will allow the Army Corps of Engineers to begin dredging the Columbia River, despite environmentalists' concerns about the wild salmon.

  • Bomb blasting goes bust

    Following a lawsuit by a coalition of Indian tribes, environmental groups and private citizens, the Sierra Army Depot has stopped burning and blasting old munitions near Herlong, Calif., and is looking to burn and blast elsewhere.

  • Growth boundary grows

    The growth boundary to limit sprawl on Colorado's Front Range, originated five years ago by concerned business leaders, developers and government officials, has been revised periodically to accommodate more growth, which critics say defeats the purpose.

  • Is this wilderness perverted?

    Utah Rep. Jim Hansen proposes half a million acres of wilderness in western Utah, but in the same amendment would dump hazardous waste in the nearby Skull Valley Goshute Reservation.

  • Temporary protection yanked in the Siskiyou

    Protection for wildlife in the Siskiyou National Forest is gone now that BLM and USFS have reopened 90 percent of lands to new mining claims before environmental studies are completed.

  • The Latest Bounce

    Zuni Indians worry about NM's Fence Lake coal mine; Santa Clara Pueblo's Black Mesa golf course; Trophy Mtn. Elk Ranch in northern Colo. restocks after slaughter from chronic wasting disease; Wyo. moves forward to manage wolves.

  • Earth First!er Judi Bari avenged at last

    A federal court jury on June 11 found FBI agents and Oakland police guilty of framing Earth First! activists Darryl Cherney and the late Judi Bari, accusing them of knowingly possessing the car bomb that exploded, injuring Bari, as part of their fight aga

  • In the throat of a black hole

    An essay from the author's book, "The Desert Cries," in which he tours Antelope Canyon, where a flood once took the lives of hikers.

  • The name might be green, but not the group

    The writer warns readers to be wary of organizations' names, which can be deceiving as to their missions.

  • Tribes blur the line between wild and hatchery fish

    Indian tribes use hatchery reform methods to train hatchery fish to behave like wild salmon.

  • The wild (and not-so-wild) sex life of salmon

    A brief explanation of the life and reproductive cycles of a salmon.

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