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  • Problems in Paradise

    The brutal murder of a Japanese tourist shines an unwelcome spotlight on the social problems plaguing Arizona’s beautiful but troubled Havasupai Reservation

  • Heard Around the West

    Library book sale gets ugly in Eugene; Satan is the problem in Utah; advice on daffodils; nude man creates brief havoc in McMinnville, Ore.; car theft thrives in the West; Snowmass Mountain’s “smoke shacks” have to go

  • Wilderness Lost

    Rebecca Stanfel always planned to take her young son Andrew on wilderness expeditions, but the onslaught of illness has taught her that nature can also be found much closer to home.

  • British writer tackles border politics

    British author Bella Pollen’s new novel, Midnight Cactus, looks at Arizona’s border issues through the eyes of an upper-class English newcomer who has left her executive husband and sought refuge in a ghost town.

  • Tipping the scales towards native species

    In Unnatural Landscapes, Ceiridwin Terrill travels to four arid sites to show how scientists fight to protect indigenous organisms from invasive species

  • The need to remember Black Sunday

    As western Colorado begins to dance to the tune of a brand-new energy boom, it’s good to remember that the last one ended in a total bust

  • The challenge of climate-change denial

    Skeptics, even irrational ones, probably once had a useful evolutionary role to play in human communities, but in the face of rapid climate change, they are becoming a fatal obstacle

  • Saving the Sierra, tale by tale

    Independent radio producers Catherine Stifter and jesikah maria ross are trying to help the Sierra Nevada by preserving the stories of the people who live there

  • Cow power

    In Idaho’s Magic Valley, cow capital of the fourth-largest milk-producing state in the U.S., entrepreneurs are hoping to cash in on all that manure by using anaerobic digesters to convert it into energy

  • Mirroring the maquila boom

    Santa Teresa, N.M., hopes to build its sluggish economy by attracting industrial suppliers for the factories just across the border in Mexico

  • Two weeks in the West

    James M. Doohan heads to final frontier (briefly) from New Mexico’s spaceport; northern spotted owls in trouble again; Veterans Conservation Corps; drugged up and rehabbing in the West

  • When the going gets tough, the tough collaborate

    Sometimes it seems that only the impact of a severe drought can get Westerners to work together on water issues

  • The Battle for the Verde

    The Verde River is one of Arizona’s last free-flowing stream, but environmental and local activists fear an ambitious planned pipeline, designed to bring groundwater to the growing Prescott area, will end up sucking the river dry

  • Heard around the West

    Bears on the ski runs; free land in Alaska; DNA cousins; train versus buffalo in South Dakota; good news, bad news about the weather; digging out of the snow near Ouray.

  • Safe out there

    To an aging, mentally ill woman named Jade, the beautiful Colorado day is filled with sinister, frightening demons, and even a well-meaning neighbor can do nothing to drive them away.

  • A brief, interpretive look at the Indian Wars

    Michael Blake’s new nonfiction book, Indian Yell, fails to live up to its ambitious subtitle, “The Heart of an American Insurgency,” with its quick tour of 12 battles between the U.S. Cavalry and American Indians.

  • The granddaddy of all collaboration groups

    In his beautiful, compact book Working Wilderness, Nathan Sayres tells the story of the Malpai Borderlands Group, “the most hailed example of collaborative place-based resource management in the West.”

  • Why the West should copy Swiss transit

    The contrast between a Mount Hood traffic jam and a week in a car-free Swiss resort convinces Bill Cook that the West needs to get serious about mass transit.

  • Run before dawn and other advice from a Native American elder

    Logan Hebner talks with a Paiute elder in Utah who advises, among other things: "Run before dawn."

  • Beauty and the Beast: The president's new monument forces southern Utah to face its tourism future

    As the small, conservative towns bordering Utah's new Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument begin to adapt to the monument they never wanted, a new vision for what gateway communities and preserved areas might be begins to slowly emerge.

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