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  • Rural Education 2.0

    Rural Education 2.0

    Tiny Vilas, Colo., thought it was a great idea to open an online school and enroll at-risk students from far-away Denver – but neither the students nor the school district ended up scoring well at report card time

  • Heard Around the West

    Squirrels vs. Santa Monica; Baby goes to rehab; crows and carriers; Maricopa County is booming big-time; Julie MacDonald vs. the Interior Department; boat horns vs. coyotes in Oxnard.

  • Imagine

    A teacher asks his students and the rest of us to imagine: What would the world be like if we had the courage to use our imaginations?

  • The hidden costs of our coal habit

    In Big Coal: The Dirty Secret Behind America’s Energy Future, Jeff Goodell reveals how the sausage is made when it comes to the primary source of America’s electricity.

  • You ain’t from around here, are you?

    In Brave New West: Morphing Moab at the Speed of Greed, Jim Stiles rips into the amenity-oriented tourist economy that has transformed his once-beloved Moab, but he offers little in the way of useful alternatives.

  • Wealthy landowners and locals wade into the ditch

    Jack Wright thinks Montanans are over-reacting to stream-access issues; after all, from the point of view of a fish, it’s a good thing when a rich man restores a stream, even if he locks out trespassers.

  • Montana puts limits on national Trout Unlimited

    When national Trout Unlimited tried to get its Montana branch to stay out of state stream-access issues, the Montanans rebelled dramatically, much to Pat Munday’s delight.

  • Bay bags his way to the top

    Brian Bay of Sandy, Utah, is the world champion of grocery-store baggers, following his triumph at the National Grocers Association Best Bagger Competition.

  • An endangered Endangered Species Act?

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service tries an end-run around the Endangered Species Act; a leaked draft would weaken the bedrock law by changing the regulations that implement it rather than the law itself.

  • The sacred and the toxic

    Just over the Arizona-Sonora border, Tohono O’odham traditionalists have joined environmental groups in fighting a proposed Mexican hazardous waste landfill.

  • Two weeks in the West

    Death (and life) in the Sonoran Desert; fire and drought in the Southwest; courts rule against Bush on environmental issues.

  • Dry to the bone

    Despite a relatively snowy winter here in western Colorado, the season itself seems to have shrunk, with spring arriving weeks earlier than it once did in a trend with ominous consequences for the desert Southwest, particularly Phoenix.

  • Phoenix Falling?

    Craig Childs lifts the rug of modern-day Phoenix, Ariz., to examine the remnants of the civilization that preceded it – the Hohokam people, who also built a great city in the middle of the desert, and flourished until the day they ran out of water.

  • Heard Around the West

    Reckless unicorns; dogs and kids will stay in those truck beds; calling Jesus in Idaho; Stardust reduced to dust; can’t afford to live in Seattle; moose takes on helicopter in Alaska.

  • The single women who homesteaded the West

    The women who homesteaded the Old West defy the stereotypes we make of them.

  • Lewis’ Web

    Wyoming microbiologist Randy Lewis is fascinated by spiders – particularly by the remarkable silk they produce.

  • Harvesting the sky

    Thirsty Santa Fe, N.M., considers an innovative law requiring all new buildings to install rainwater-harvesting systems.

  • Two weeks in the West

    No yellow snow for Snowbowl; gonorrhea and meth: a match made in hell; split-estate bills in New Mexico and Colorado; Montana’s green energy bills languish; “Rocky Mountain High” second Colorado state song, bolo tie is official New Mexico neckwear.

  • It tolls for us

    The energy boom in the Rocky Mountain West has been shadowed by a much darker boom: a frightening rise in death and serious injury

  • Disposable workers of the oil and gas fields

    Without a college degree, work on the oil and gas fields is the best job you can get in the rural West – unless, of course, it kills you

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