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  • Have knives and hooks, will travel

    Taos County’s new Mobile Matanza is a rolling livestock butchering unit that travels to the region’s far-flung family ranchers

  • Environmental change

    Sen. Pete Domenici, R-N.M., does an about-face and moves to protect New Mexico’s Valle Vidal from oil and gas drilling

  • River Redux

    Six decades after Friant Dam killed off the San Joaquin River’s spring-run chinook, the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Friant Water Users Authority are working with the federal government to restore both the fish and the river

  • Two weeks in the West

    Colorado Lynx are in trouble; oil and gas bounty hunter is rebuked; Energy Department tests new larger containers for radioactive waste; saving money and salmon; Measure 37 cold war continues; public library use in the West; and snowmobile data

  • Whistling in the park

    Whistleblowing is not as romantic as Woodward’s "Deep Throat" makes it sound, but the retired public servants who make up the Coalition of National Park Service Retirees are doing valuable work, blowing the whistle for the sake of the national parks

  • Old but Faithful

    Former Park Service supervisors Bill Wade and Rob Arnberger formed the Coalition of National Park Service Retirees to defend the national parks from what they see as the Bush administration’s ill-conceived changes

  • Soused in the saddle

    Colorado man cited for riding under the influence.

  • 'The suburbs have some bad choices'

    Colorado River Water Conservation District head Eric Kuhn says the Denver suburbs have some difficult choices ahead in their quest for more water.

  • 'Where is the metro area going to get itswater?'

    Former Colo. Gov. Dick Lamm believes that the state's continuing population growth will make the Two Forks veto a temporary and Pyrrhic victory.

  • 'The world would be different if not for the veto'

    Denver Water Department head Hamlet 'Chips' Barry describes some of the lessons the city has learned from the Two Forks veto.

  • On the phone, on the Rez

    Wireless phones have become popular among the rural residents of the Southwest's sprawling Navajo Reservation.

  • From nuclear fuel to nature trails

    Oregon may set a precedent with its planned transformation of the defunct Trojan nuclear power plant into a state park.

  • Anchors away?

    A committee of rock climbers, wilderness advocates, Forest Service officials and others is at a stalemate on the question of whether permanent climbing anchors should be allowed in wilderness areas.

  • The latest bounce

    Vermilion Cliffs is a new mounument in Ariz.; Forest Service can buy land in Colorado's Red Mountain Mining District; NFS to buy land in Wash. from Plum Creek Timber Co.

  • A desert state axes water planning

    Nevada conservationists are stunned by the recent dismantling of the state's Division of Water Planning, largely due to ranchers, miners and rural officials who resented the recommendations of its recently revised state water plan.

  • Hear that whistle blowin'

    Citizens of Creede, Colo., a small historic mining town, are split over businessman Don Shank's plans to run a tourist train from South park to Creede on Union Pacific's abandoned tracks.

  • Voters pummel planning, ban new elk farms

    Among the Western election results highlighted are the failure of anti-sprawl initiatives in Colorado and Arizona, a ban on game farms in Montana, and legislative races in Montana, Idaho, Utah and Colorado.

  • A 'most improbable scenerio' has come to pass

    HCN's political columnist considers the recent, weird and not-quite-finished election, and suggests that if George Bush turns out to be the winner, he will have to govern from the middle, which could prove good news for the environment.

  • David Brower: Remembering the Archdruid

    Conservationists mourn the recent death of David Brower, former Sierra Club director, founder of Friends of the Earth and Earth Island Institute, and passionate fighter against dams and for the wild.

  • Water pressure

    At the 10-year anniversary of William Reilly's veto of Colorado's proposed Two Forks dam, the continuing growth of Denver's sprawling suburbs leads some to worry that the dam might well be brought back to life.

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