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Rest-rotation range plan -- panacea of problem? January 14, 1977

Rest-rotation range plan -- panacea of problem?

Both critics and advocates are weighing in on the U.S. Bureau of Land Management's drive to improve deteriorating range conditions on public lands in the West through a grazing system known as rest-rotation.

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Domestic technology offers low-income people opportunity December 17, 1976

Domestic technology offers low-income people opportunity

At a time when energy prices are making it increasingly difficult for people to make ends meet, Malcolm Lillywhite shows people simple technology that they can use to produce quality food and shelter at low cost.

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Utah oil shale boom: not if, but when December 03, 1976

Utah oil shale boom: not if, but when

Unknowns are plaguing oil shale development southwest of Vernal, Utah, but the burst of optimism for oil shale in the early 1970s has many local residents saying that extraction of oil from their abundant rock is inevitable.

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Boulder adopts plan to slow growth November 19, 1976

Boulder adopts plan to slow growth

Boulder, Colorado, has become the first community in the Rocky Mountain West to attempt to slow down its growth rate by city ordinance, which will limit the amount of new housing.

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Uranium experiment moves into northeast Colorado November 05, 1976

Uranium experiment moves into northeast Colorado

Residents of Weld County, Colorado, are worried that proposed uranium mining in the area will destroy farmland.

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Telluride blues, a hatchet job October 22, 1976

Telluride blues, a hatchet job

Telluride, Colorado, formerly an honest, decayed little mining town of about 300 souls, is now a bustling whore of a ski resort with a population of 1,500 and many more to come.

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Rocks, rivers, snakes, solitude -- Owyhee October 08, 1976

Rocks, rivers, snakes, solitude -- Owyhee

Two spectacular river gorges in southwest Idaho -- the Owyhee and the Bruneau -- are being considered for study as possible national wild and scenic rivers, with surrounding primitive areas.

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Joy, shipmates, joy! September 24, 1976

Joy, shipmates, joy!

Excerpts from a speech delivered by Edward Abbey at a conference in Vail, Colorado. "I say the industrialization of the Rocky Mountain West is not inevitable and that to plan for such a catastrophe is to invite it ..."

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Women face boom town isolation September 10, 1976

Women face boom town isolation

In remote Jeffrey City, Wyoming, owned and operated by Western Nuclear, some women are determined to get out and participate in activities while others prefer the refuge of their homes.

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John Wesley Powell tests El Dorado August 27, 1976

John Wesley Powell tests El Dorado

John Wesley Powell told the hard truth about the West, but his advice for a more considerate approach to westward expansion was widely scorned and largely rejected.

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Shell says, 'We'll plan -- our way' July 30, 1976

Shell says, 'We'll plan -- our way'

Residents of the tiny mountain community of Shell, Wyoming, emerged from an unlikely planning meeting with smiles on their faces, having created a land-use plan that apparently satisfied even those who were most opposed.

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Northern Cheyenne want Class I air July 16, 1976

Northern Cheyenne want Class I air

The Northern Cheyenne Indian tribe in southern Montana has become the first land manager to ask the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to allow it to keep its air clean with a Class I designation, which would affect the planned expansion of the Colstrip coal-fired power plant.

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San Luis Valley shows rural ingenuity July 02, 1976

San Luis Valley shows rural ingenuity

Residents of southern Colorado's San Luis Valley aren't waiting for federal or state lawmakers to solve their energy problems. They have taken the matter into their own hands, and have several dozen working solar systems as proof of their success.

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An invitation to a very strange place June 18, 1976

An invitation to a very strange place

Wyoming's Red Desert, full of grotesque geologic structures and thousands of greasewood-studded lake beds that dry to great expanses of red crust, is a strange place in need of defenders.

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Designating wilderness -- asking for destruction? June 04, 1976

Designating wilderness -- asking for destruction?

Land that is scenic, well-watered, and with recreation opportunities will be heavily used regardless of whether or not it is designated as wilderness. Many wilderness areas receive little use at all.

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Navajo Nation faces development May 21, 1976

Navajo Nation faces development

The Bureau of Reclamation's Navajo Indian Irrigation Project brings modern, irrigated agriculture to a parched landscape -- and the possibility of large-scale industry that could compete for the water.

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House bill prompts public lands alert May 07, 1976

House bill prompts public lands alert

A coalition of 19 conservation organizations warns that the proposed Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA) of 1976 would severely limit the federal government's ability to protect long-term natural resource values, putting the nation's public lands at risk.

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Kaiparowits coal power plans scuttled April 23, 1976

Kaiparowits coal power plans scuttled

Southern California Edison has backed down from its plan to construct the controversial 3,000 megawatt Kaiparowits coal-fired power plant in central Utah, citing increasing costs, environmental constraints, and pending regulatory legislation.

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'Either we share it or we lose it' April 09, 1976

'Either we share it or we lose it'

The proposal to designate a big chunk of wild land in Idaho as the River of No Return Wilderness has created new conflicts that jeopardize the land's longstanding wild character.

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Jackson Hole wrestles with growth March 26, 1976

Jackson Hole wrestles with growth

Jackson Hole officials have tried to shape and slow the rapid growth sparked by the opening of the Teton Village Ski Area in 1966, but their efforts haven't been enough.

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Saving swamps for ducks and men March 12, 1976

Saving swamps for ducks and men

Although swamps have historically been viewed as unattractive and worthless, a building movement -- buoyed by federal laws -- recognizes wetlands as havens for wildlife that also hold and purify water used by humans.

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Salesmen with sun power woo West February 27, 1976

Salesmen with sun power woo West

The solar energy industry is a booming business, containing all of the perils of rapid growth -- fast-buck men, scant history, few standards and regulations, and consumer confusion.

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BLM farm plans hold promise, problems February 13, 1976

BLM farm plans hold promise, problems

Lack of clear goals for Idaho agriculture becomes more evident as the U.S. Bureau of Land Management wrestles with plans to convert thousands of acres of desert lands managed by that agency into individual private farms sanctioned by the Desert Land Act and the Carey Act.

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Donkey dilemma damages public land January 30, 1976

Donkey dilemma damages public land

Damage to sensitive desert ecosystems is causing some to take a hard look at the Wild Free Roaming Horse and Burro Act of 1971, which was the first time Congress gave full protection to a non-native species animal.

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Court lifts Powder River injunction January 16, 1976

Court lifts Powder River injunction

The U.S. Supreme Court has lifted an injunction barring four coal companies and a railroad from proceeding with coal development in Wyoming's eastern Powder River Basin, opening the way to full-scale development of the region's coal.

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