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Western Election Review November 17, 1978

Western Election Review

Largely because of pocketbook promises from the candidates, voters in the Northern Plains and Rockies states have apparently stacked the deck against progressive environmental lawmaking in the state legislatures next year.

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Amory Lovins brings good news November 03, 1978

Amory Lovins brings good news

Amory Lovins delivers a message that grassroots efforts and individual action can create a transition to "soft technology" -- diverse, renewable, relatively simple and matched in scale to their end use needs.

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National Park Service chases squirrels of political popularity October 20, 1978

National Park Service chases squirrels of political popularity

As the National Park Service has expanded to manage new and unusual places, it has grown into a sprawling agency that is less professional than the Forest Service, less dedicated to management principles than the Fish and Widlife Service, and more set in its ways than the Bureau of Land Management.

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Merson flaunts environmental bias October 06, 1978

Merson flaunts environmental bias

Despite criticism, Alan Merson, recently appointed the regional administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency in Denver, doesn't back down from claims that he's an environmentalist.

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Conservationist offers remedy for Overthrust strife September 22, 1978

Conservationist offers remedy for Overthrust strife

A Sierra Club member's attempt to compromise on oil and gas development on potential wilderness lands along the Overthrust Belt -- a 60-mile wide swath of high petroleum potential that runs from northwestern Montana south into Utah -- has won only mild praise and some criticism from the energy industry.

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1978, the year the Senate shortchanged Alaska? September 08, 1978

1978, the year the Senate shortchanged Alaska?

The Alaska National Interest Lands Act, which includes protections for Gates of the Arctic National Park, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, and other wild lands, faces a tricky Congress debate and a looming deadline.

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Congress, Carter lock horns on water projects August 25, 1978

Congress, Carter lock horns on water projects

Despite President Jimmy Carter's warning that he will veto any appropriations bill that includes six contested water projects, Congress has included those projects in the 1979 Public Works Appropriations bill.

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Power emissions may reduce ag productivity July 28, 1978

Power emissions may reduce ag productivity

Preliminary results from studies of vegetation near the Colstrip, Montana, coal-fired power plant indicate that plants are absorbing sulfur dioxide, and that crops and grazing land could be dramatically affected in the long term.

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Activists torn over what's best for wild horses July 14, 1978

Activists torn over what's best for wild horses

The federal government is desperately searching for ways to manage the horse and burro populations in ways that will be economically feasible and publicly acceptable, but environmental groups acknowledge there's little chance of pleasing everyone.

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RARE II tables turn; conservationists enraged June 30, 1978

RARE II tables turn; conservationists enraged

When the Forest Service began its second Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE II) a year ago, industry representative feared it. But now, as environmentalists and even agency officials themselves criticize the plan, timber and mining interests are the only ones who seem pleased.

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Lame ducks and a question mark lead Wyoming June 16, 1978

Lame ducks and a question mark lead Wyoming

Sen. Malcom Wallop's shifty and compromising environmental record is an indication of politics in Wyoming, where "conservative" and "conservation" and still uneasily linked.

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Dirty air a health hazard in 30 areas of West June 02, 1978

Dirty air a health hazard in 30 areas of West

While air pollution is generally not considered to be a problem in the West (with the obvious exceptions like Los Angeles and Denver), all Western states have areas that do not meet minimum federal clean air standards.

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Montanans face turmoil next election May 19, 1978

Montanans face turmoil next election

Montana's congressional delegation may be going through major changes this year after almost two decades of stability under the combined leadership of Democratic Senators Mike Mansfield and Lee Metcalf.

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Environmentalists, backlash, and the 'New Right' May 05, 1978

Environmentalists, backlash, and the 'New Right'

Political attacks against Arizona Congressman Morris Udall are one example of recent political backlash against environmentalism, and may be part of a larger shift toward conservatism.

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McGrew calls insulation push 'a consumer ripoff' April 21, 1978

McGrew calls insulation push 'a consumer ripoff'

Jay McGrew, an independent energy conservation consultant, says "the insulation business is a little bit like the insurance business. The salesmen always want to sell you more than you need."

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Idaho elects wilderness champ and foe to Congress April 07, 1978

Idaho elects wilderness champ and foe to Congress

Idaho voters continue to elect both Sen. Frank Church, who has gained a national reputation as an environmental leader, as well as Rep. Steve Symms, who is known for wanting to abolish the Environmental Protection Agency.

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Colorado, maverick of the inland Western states March 24, 1978

Colorado, maverick of the inland Western states

Colorado's congressional delegation has the best environmental voting record of any state in the Northern Rockies. Only on the issue of water has Colorado recently voted as a typical inland Western delegation.

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The West mines, mills and worships radioactive fuel March 10, 1978

The West mines, mills and worships radioactive fuel

As with any other Western religion, the worship of uranium is a mixture of love and fear of the deity worshiped. And fear of radioactive uranium may be well justified.

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North Dakota's delegation listens to agriculture February 24, 1978

North Dakota's delegation listens to agriculture

All three of North Dakota's congressmen were first elected before the environment was a major political issue, and because the state has a strong tradition of returning incumbents to office, all three continue to be re-elected despite their generally poor environmental records.

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Are commercial solar systems worth the price? February 10, 1978

Are commercial solar systems worth the price?

Enthusiasm for solar electric technology is being dampened by the reality that most consumers cannot afford it.

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Defenders of nature in the nation's highest court January 27, 1978

Defenders of nature in the nation's highest court

William O. Douglas has articulated one of the most progressive environmental concepts of recent times: that the natural world should have legal rights.

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BPA bill shapes destiny of states in Rockies January 13, 1978

BPA bill shapes destiny of states in Rockies

Conservationists are alarmed by a bill that would makes it easier for the Bonneville Power Administration to build power plants in Western coal-producing states.

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Indians wresting for control over their minerals December 30, 1977

Indians wresting for control over their minerals

Indian tribes, given land that a hundred years ago was often considered wasteland, realize that the vast wealth of their coal, oil, gas, and uranium can represent both a threat as well as a blessing, and are taking steps to increase tribal influence over Indian-owned energy resources.

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Yellowcake spilled; clean up slow, disorganized December 16, 1977

Yellowcake spilled; clean up slow, disorganized

A highway accident on Colorado's southeastern plains resulted in a spill of ground-up concentrate of uranium oxide, raising danger of radiation poisoning in the vicinity.

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Oil development threatens forests December 02, 1977

Oil development threatens forests

The discovery of a potential major oil and gas deposit in the heart of the Bridger-Teton National Forest in western Wyoming is creating a conflict between two highly valued resources: oil and wilderness.

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