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High prices, doubts plague wind power revival June 15, 1979

High prices, doubts plague wind power revival

Despite a resurgence of enthusiasm for wind power, expensive new wind turbines -- many of which are proving unreliable -- are undermining widespread adoption.

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Could energy seekers make Old Faithful falter? June 01, 1979

Could energy seekers make Old Faithful falter?

Targhee National Forest officials, who manage nearly all of the Island Park Geothermal Area adjacent to Yellowstone National Park, are being pressured by more than 70 parties who want to drill for hot water that would be used to generate electricity.

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The nation's hottest spot for cheap solar homes May 18, 1979

The nation's hottest spot for cheap solar homes

Out of necessity, many residents in and around sunny but cold Taos, N. Mex., have turned to passive solar technology to heat their homes.

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On the watch for the elusive ferret May 04, 1979

On the watch for the elusive ferret

To try and bring the elusive black-footed ferret back from the brink of extinction, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct stealthy inventories of the the animal's habitat.

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Feds eye West for radioactive garbage dump April 20, 1979

Feds eye West for radioactive garbage dump

As nuclear waste piles up, environmentalists predict that the West will bear the main burden of a mounting federal effort to dispose of the waste.

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Slurry carries coal, water and controversy April 06, 1979

Slurry carries coal, water and controversy

New coal slurry pipeline proposals are raising major regional questions concerning water use priorities, Indian water rights, interstate cooperation and competition, and perhaps even the scale of future Western coal development.

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Stalemates spawn new breed: the eco-mediators March 23, 1979

Stalemates spawn new breed: the eco-mediators

With varying degrees of success, mediation has been substituted for legal or political confrontation in a number of recent environmental battles.

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States ponder: who should pay to keep air clean? March 09, 1979

States ponder: who should pay to keep air clean?

When Congress passed the Clean Air Act amendments in 1977, it didn't approve federal funds for the studies necessary for air quality classification, meaning that most states have trouble accessing the law's protections.

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Nation now molding its first Indian water policy February 23, 1979

Nation now molding its first Indian water policy

President Jimmy Carter has taken the first step toward establishing a national Indian water policy, which has been defined de facto by large water projects that flood Indian lands while not providing a proportional share of the water.

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Colorado donors fear nongame double-cross February 09, 1979

Colorado donors fear nongame double-cross

In Colorado, the public has rallied to the defense of "nongame" wildlife -- animals that are deemed to have no commercial value, and have tended to be overlooked in management -- but the effort may be undermined by the state legislature.

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BLM, back in the spotlight after year of neglect January 26, 1979

BLM, back in the spotlight after year of neglect

The Bureau of Land Management, the least known and most maligned public land agency, oversees more than 350 million acres of lands that are increasingly valuable and cherished despite being handed down from the failed policies of Western settlement.

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Will a tight-fisted Congress be tough on the environment? January 12, 1979

Will a tight-fisted Congress be tough on the environment?

As the 96th Congress convenes, the gains of the past decade and a half may be sorely tested by legislators well-tuned to demands for fiscal conservatism.

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BLM catches flak for wilderness inventory December 29, 1978

BLM catches flak for wilderness inventory

As the Bureau of Land Management inventories potential wilderness on the 174 million acres its oversees in the Western states, industry spokesmen are leveling charges of "land grab" while conservationists are concerned about the compressed timetables and a lack of knowledge.

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Recharge could bring water, wildlife to dry plains December 15, 1978

Recharge could bring water, wildlife to dry plains

A plan to divert the South Platte River in order to recharge groundwater and ease an agricultural water shortage on Colorado's northeastern plains might also create wetlands that would provide needed wildlife habitat.

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TVA to be first at cleaning up old uranium site December 01, 1978

TVA to be first at cleaning up old uranium site

The Tennessee Valley Authority will begin remediation of a uranium mill in Edgemont, South Dakota, and the agreement about who will pay for the cleanup could pave the way for remediation of other sites across the West that are contaminated by uranium.

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Western Election Review November 17, 1978

Western Election Review

Largely because of pocketbook promises from the candidates, voters in the Northern Plains and Rockies states have apparently stacked the deck against progressive environmental lawmaking in the state legislatures next year.

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Amory Lovins brings good news November 03, 1978

Amory Lovins brings good news

Amory Lovins delivers a message that grassroots efforts and individual action can create a transition to "soft technology" -- diverse, renewable, relatively simple and matched in scale to their end use needs.

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National Park Service chases squirrels of political popularity October 20, 1978

National Park Service chases squirrels of political popularity

As the National Park Service has expanded to manage new and unusual places, it has grown into a sprawling agency that is less professional than the Forest Service, less dedicated to management principles than the Fish and Widlife Service, and more set in its ways than the Bureau of Land Management.

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Merson flaunts environmental bias October 06, 1978

Merson flaunts environmental bias

Despite criticism, Alan Merson, recently appointed the regional administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency in Denver, doesn't back down from claims that he's an environmentalist.

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Conservationist offers remedy for Overthrust strife September 22, 1978

Conservationist offers remedy for Overthrust strife

A Sierra Club member's attempt to compromise on oil and gas development on potential wilderness lands along the Overthrust Belt -- a 60-mile wide swath of high petroleum potential that runs from northwestern Montana south into Utah -- has won only mild praise and some criticism from the energy industry.

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1978, the year the Senate shortchanged Alaska? September 08, 1978

1978, the year the Senate shortchanged Alaska?

The Alaska National Interest Lands Act, which includes protections for Gates of the Arctic National Park, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, and other wild lands, faces a tricky Congress debate and a looming deadline.

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Congress, Carter lock horns on water projects August 25, 1978

Congress, Carter lock horns on water projects

Despite President Jimmy Carter's warning that he will veto any appropriations bill that includes six contested water projects, Congress has included those projects in the 1979 Public Works Appropriations bill.

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Power emissions may reduce ag productivity July 28, 1978

Power emissions may reduce ag productivity

Preliminary results from studies of vegetation near the Colstrip, Montana, coal-fired power plant indicate that plants are absorbing sulfur dioxide, and that crops and grazing land could be dramatically affected in the long term.

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Activists torn over what's best for wild horses July 14, 1978

Activists torn over what's best for wild horses

The federal government is desperately searching for ways to manage the horse and burro populations in ways that will be economically feasible and publicly acceptable, but environmental groups acknowledge there's little chance of pleasing everyone.

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RARE II tables turn; conservationists enraged June 30, 1978

RARE II tables turn; conservationists enraged

When the Forest Service began its second Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE II) a year ago, industry representative feared it. But now, as environmentalists and even agency officials themselves criticize the plan, timber and mining interests are the only ones who seem pleased.

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  1. Rancher vs BLM: a 20-year standoff ends with tense roundup |
  2. Photos of a standoff | Armed militia members join a Nevada rancher to pro...
  3. The energy haves and have-nots | Will rooftop solar owners get off the grid — and...
  4. Why homes are lost to wildfire | This Forest Service expert says it's as much a soc...
  5. The future of the Sacramento Delta hangs in the balance | But few Californians seem to grasp what is at stak...
  1. Why homes are lost to wildfire | This Forest Service expert says it's as much a soc...
  2. Photos of a standoff | Armed militia members join a Nevada rancher to pro...
  3. The energy haves and have-nots | Will rooftop solar owners get off the grid — and...
  4. Will the Colorado River reach the Gulf of California once more? | Photographs of last month's historic water pulses....
  5. Locals resist a Bakkenization of the Beartooths | South-central Montanans oppose new drilling, forew...
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