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One man's indictment of forestry in Arizona November 11, 1985

One man's indictment of forestry in Arizona

Investigative journalist Ray Ring digs into Forest Service reports to explain why Arizona has been logged more intensively than any other Western state.

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The fully operational MX missile October 28, 1985

The fully operational MX missile

The U.S. Air Force will soon deploy the first operational MX nuclear missile near Cheyenne, Wyo.

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Last stand for the Colorado Plateau October 14, 1985

Last stand for the Colorado Plateau

Half of Utah -- and the vast majority of its BLM wilderness candidates -- lies in the hotly contested and spectacular Colorado Plateau.

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Let the brawl begin September 30, 1985

Let the brawl begin

For decades, the Missouri River basin has gotten along without interstate water compacts and lawsuits -- but now that's changing.

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Seeing the forest through the eyes of its users September 16, 1985

Seeing the forest through the eyes of its users

A special issue on forestry, based on the belief that what happens on the ground counts as much as what the Forest Service decides, the lawyers argue or the Congress legislates.

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How to articulate the delight? August 19, 1985

How to articulate the delight?

There are simple pleasures in being a fire lookout in Idaho.

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The Wilderness Society's outstanding alumni August 05, 1985

The Wilderness Society's outstanding alumni

Most former staff from the Wilderness Society are still doing grassroots wilderness work in the West. They just aren't working for the Wilderness Society.

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Bailing out a National Monument in New Mexico July 22, 1985

Bailing out a National Monument in New Mexico

Heavy runoff has overflowed the Cochiti Reservoir, threatening the Anasazi ruins and wildlife of Bandelier National Monument.

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A fruitgrower falls prey to his poisonous sprays July 08, 1985

A fruitgrower falls prey to his poisonous sprays

Fruitgrowers in the North Fork Valley in Delta County, Colo., wake up to the dangerous health effects of pesticides.

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Murky language lands an EIS in deep water June 24, 1985

Murky language lands an EIS in deep water

If a court ruling holds up, federal bureaucrats may have to re-think how they write Environmental Impact Statements.

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The Endangered Species Act is thus far a glass hammer June 10, 1985

The Endangered Species Act is thus far a glass hammer

A special issue examines how, despite the 1973 Endangered Species Act, plants and animals continue to vanish from the earth at a rapid pace.

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Wilderness: It ain't what you think May 27, 1985

Wilderness: It ain't what you think

A special issue on wilderness management.

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Mining may come to a wilderness May 13, 1985

Mining may come to a wilderness

Taking advantage of the 1872 Mining Law and the exemption in the Wilderness Act, U.S. Borax and the American Smelting and Refining Company want to mine in Montana's Cabinet Mountains.

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A financial buccaneer and his resort come to Idaho's Priest Lake April 29, 1985

A financial buccaneer and his resort come to Idaho's Priest Lake

Priest Lake's future is tangled in a web of money-making through the doings and undoings of British financier Sir James Goldsmith.

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Peaches and apples roar back April 15, 1985

Peaches and apples roar back

In the wake of the collapse of the early 1980s oil shale boom in and around Palisade, Colo., fruitgrowing is one of the few games in town.

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A New Mexico uranium town wonders how far it will fall April 01, 1985

A New Mexico uranium town wonders how far it will fall

Grants Pass, N.M., was a thriving town built on the uranium boom that peaked in 1980. But in the wake of the uranium bust, businesses are hurting and unemployment has hit 25 percent.

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A busted Wyoming mining town remains haunted by 550 lost jobs March 18, 1985

A busted Wyoming mining town remains haunted by 550 lost jobs

In Part 2 of a two-issue series on boom and bust in Wyoming, Lander is still reeling from U.S. Steel's decision last April to permanently close its Atlanta City iron ore mine.

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The West as military target March 04, 1985

The West as military target

The Navy and Air Force are planning to convert 8,500 square miles of public air space in Nevada into a supersonic jet training area.

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The boom is back in southwestern Wyoming February 18, 1985

The boom is back in southwestern Wyoming

In Part 1 of a two-issue series on boom and bust in Wyoming, Exxon has announced plans to double the size of its giant Shute Creek gas processing plant already under construction, possibly needing a workforce of 5,000 people.

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Uranium mines and mills may have caused birth defects among Navajo Indians February 04, 1985

Uranium mines and mills may have caused birth defects among Navajo Indians

Down the dusty back roads of the Navajo Nation, scientists are tracking an invisible killer which may be responsible for the maiming of hundreds of Navajo children.

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The Forest Service meets its critics January 21, 1985

The Forest Service meets its critics

Forest Service Chief Max Peterson comes to Casper, Wyo., and San Francisco, Calif., to speak about recreational user fees, logging subsidies and other controversial issues.

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Seeing the forest for the trees December 24, 1984

Seeing the forest for the trees

As forest plans are applied to the National Forests over the next fifty years, how are the forests going to look?

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Is America's Indian policy that of 'starve or sell'? December 10, 1984

Is America's Indian policy that of 'starve or sell'?

To some, the issue with a vetoed Indian health care bill is simply the delivery of health services on and off reservations. But to others it is a possible plot to put the tribes in a position where they must deal away their natural resources at low prices in order to survive.

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A Guide to the 99th Congress November 26, 1984

A Guide to the 99th Congress

A special issue with analysis of the November 1984 election, plus a look ahead at how Congress may treat wilderness, water and other issues.

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Fierce beauty devoid of economic advantage November 12, 1984

Fierce beauty devoid of economic advantage

One of the curious paradoxes of the American experience is that many of those who live in closest proximity to wilderness exhibit the greatest contempt for it.

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