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In southern Utah: Voters reject an industrial future January 02, 1989

In southern Utah: Voters reject an industrial future

By a two-to-one margin, Grand County residents voted down a toxic waste incinerator slated for the all-but-abandoned railroad town of Cisco.

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The West's nuclear revolt December 19, 1988

The West's nuclear revolt

The Department of Energy -- a mainstay of the West's economy -- is in serious trouble.

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Oil industry rolls over opponents December 05, 1988

Oil industry rolls over opponents

Jackson Hole environmentalists and local government suffered two big defeats recently in the ongoing war over oil and gas leasing on Wyoming's Bridger-Teton National Forest.

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The West voted left, right and center November 21, 1988

The West voted left, right and center

Analysis of 1988 Election results from 13 Western states.

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The future October 24, 1988

The future

Part 4 of The Reopening of the Western Frontier, a four-issue series exploring the West's changing economic and cultural landscape.

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Environmentalism triumphant October 10, 1988

Environmentalism triumphant

Part 3 of The Reopening of the Western Frontier, a four-issue series exploring the West's changing economic and cultural landscape.

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The bust in agriculture and mining September 26, 1988

The bust in agriculture and mining

Part 2 of The Reopening of the Western Frontier, a four-issue series exploring the West's changing economic and cultural landscape.

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The Reopening of the Western Frontier, Part 1 September 12, 1988

The Reopening of the Western Frontier, Part 1

Thanks to a mixture of geography, climate and natural resources, the rural West became the domain of a particular way of life that has lasted for 100 years. But today its economies are in retreat, and the Western frontier is reopening.

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Backhoe roots around in Indian graves August 29, 1988

Backhoe roots around in Indian graves

After nearly a century of neglect and vandalism, an area called Fourmile Ruin near Taylor, Ariz., is being excavated, not in a search for information about its original inhabitants but for its valuable pottery.

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Growing up among the ruins in Blanding, Utah August 15, 1988

Growing up among the ruins in Blanding, Utah

How do you explain what it is like to be able to walk five miles in any direction from town and find a rubble mound or masonry ruin?

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City slickers strike it rich in South Dakota August 01, 1988

City slickers strike it rich in South Dakota

A plan to invigorate the state's economy by taking sewage ash from the Twin Cities backfires.

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Can nuclear waste be salted away? July 18, 1988

Can nuclear waste be salted away?

All is not well with the nation's first planned nuclear-waste dump, the Waste Isolation Pilot Project.

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Parks are increasingly vulnerable June 20, 1988

Parks are increasingly vulnerable

Like lines drawn in the sand, the borders of America's national parks have not prevented the crowding and shoving of neighboring public and private landowners.

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Will the Crow Tribe dribble away $29 million in coal tax money? June 06, 1988

Will the Crow Tribe dribble away $29 million in coal tax money?

A ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court opens up an old account and allows the tribe to set its own coal tax rates.

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How do you combine birds and bombs? May 23, 1988

How do you combine birds and bombs?

Along Idaho's Snake River, military war-games run up against the densest known concentration of nesting raptors in the world.

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Two Forks Dam: Push comes to shove May 09, 1988

Two Forks Dam: Push comes to shove

The proposed project has become a national issue, with environmental and citizens groups facing off against water planners.

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Ecotage versus infiltrage: A tale of two environmental strategies April 25, 1988

Ecotage versus infiltrage: A tale of two environmental strategies

An in-depth issue on The Nature Conservancy and Earth First!

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God's country is being developed April 11, 1988

God's country is being developed

Church Universal and Triumphant stirs controversy on the northern edge of Yellowstone National Park.

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Off-road vehicles and the public's land March 28, 1988

Off-road vehicles and the public's land

At issue in southern Arizona and elsewhere is a continuing debate over what to do about a form of recreation that is growing so rapidly that officials feel helpless.

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Montana's Clark Fork River: An industrial drain March 14, 1988

Montana's Clark Fork River: An industrial drain

The Clark Fork of the Columbia has been neglected and abused for decades, and is only now gaining the attention of people who are determined to bring it back to life.

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Oil and gas leasing reform: Somewhat more than half a loaf February 29, 1988

Oil and gas leasing reform: Somewhat more than half a loaf

Efforts to correct problems with oil and gas leasing on public lands have produced a confusing and often contradictory welter of legislation and court decisions that have left central issues unresolved.

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South Dakota Sioux demand the Black Hills February 15, 1988

South Dakota Sioux demand the Black Hills

Their hope for the future rests on the fact that the U.S. government took their land by imposing a fraudulent treaty on them in 1877 -- the same year that Crazy Horse was killed by a bayonet-wielding soldier.

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Idaho's potato king proposes 100 power plants February 01, 1988

Idaho's potato king proposes 100 power plants

The state's richest man, industrialist J.R. Simplot, announced in late December that he wants to build 100 coal-fired power plants along the Snake River over the next 50 years.

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Is the grizzly adapting fast enough? January 04, 1988

Is the grizzly adapting fast enough?

While there is hope that the grizzly is nearing recovery in the short term, most scientists remain worried about the long haul.

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Caves need protection December 21, 1987

Caves need protection

Congress considers a little-known bill -- the Federal Cave Resources Protection Act -- that would guard the thousands of caves underlying public lands from vandalism and other forms of destruction.

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