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The Big Swing June 12, 2017

The Big Swing

In this issue, we examine the subtleties of Western politics by trying to understand why one Colorado county swung from blue to red in the last election. The county has long been Democratic, with roots in coal production and unions, yet voters in Walsenburg lost faith in professional politicians and voted for now-President Donald Trump. Also, Wyoming considers its wilderness study areas, new studies show the West's water supplies are dwindling, and urban families fight health-harming heat.

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The Cost of a Comeback May 29, 2017

The Cost of a Comeback

In this issue, we delve into some of the strange intersections between humans and animals. Associate editor Tay Wiles introduces us to members of Nevada’s Agriculture Enforcement Unit, who ride the range investigating a spate of mysterious bovine injuries, and for our cover story, writer Julia Rosen takes us into the paradoxical world of bighorn sheep conservation that's pitted conservationists against each other.

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Prison Town May 15, 2017

Prison Town

In this issue, a look at Adelanto, California, and the economies it has turned to in order to survive: desert farming, then a military air base and finally an immigration incarceration center. Also, bears and tourists in national parks, some of Oregon’s houseless find a home, and oil and gas development under Colorado suburbs leads to a deadly explosion.

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Change Comes to Short Creek May 01, 2017

Change Comes to Short Creek

In this issue, our feature story explores a small corner of the region: A fundamentalist empire called Short Creek on the Arizona-Utah border that's feeling the encroaching pressure of the modern-day West. There we find uncomfortable truth — but an important aspect of the past. In the rest of the issue, we have an eye on the future: A Westerner on the Supreme Court, and solutions to endless sprawl in water-scarce Arizona.

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Firestorm April 03, 2017

Firestorm

This issue’s cover story takes us into towering plumes of smoke to follow the work of researchers. New studies are uncovering how intense wildfires create their own weather and move across the land — knowledge that could save lives. It's a reminder of stake: If President Donald Trump’s budget cuts hobble that research, it will harm, not strengthen, the West’s security. Plus, the growing voice of sportsmen, communities protecting immigrants, and a public-lands love affair.

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The Tree Ring March 20, 2017

The Tree Ring

In our latest issue, we take a look back on our political history: In 1983, Reagan’s pick to head the environmental Protection agency, Anne Gorsuch, led the charge to slash her own agency’s budget and relax pollution standards. Scott Pruitt, the Trump administration’s new EPA administrator, has staked out an eerily similar path. In our cover story, a Washington man at the center of a timber-poaching gang wanted to help investigators — but he probably didn't think it would backfire and lead to an investigation that would land him in jail.

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Uncomfortable Corners March 06, 2017

Uncomfortable Corners

In this year's Travel Issue, we have tried to push deep into the unexpected, or even uncomfortable, corners of the West. These are not vacation stories, necessarily. But they are travel stories. They are as much inner journeys as outer, all prompted by the unique features of our great region, places often forgotten or ignored.

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Overdosed February 20, 2017

Overdosed

In this issue, we investigate how the tentacles of a national opioid and heroin epidemic have reached the rural West. To help tell that story, Assistant Editor Paige Blankenbuehler reported in tiny Craig, Colorado, where she uncovered a private practice that spurred a complicated drug crisis that continues to outpace the available resources for addicts, the health care community and law enforcement.

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River of Healing February 06, 2017

River of Healing

As a new administration begins to overhaul U.S. regulatory system, we take a deeper look at the meaning of wilderness. Florence Williams, in our cover feature, tags along on an Idaho outing along a "River of No Return." The experience proved transformative for many of the women, damaged by the war, who found solace in nature.

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For Which it Stands January 23, 2017

For Which it Stands

How the movement at Standing Rock and its protestors' efforts extended well beyond North Dakota. While the pipeline is stalled (for now), its impacts are planting seeds, however small, within social and environmental movements and for tribal sovereignty across the country.

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Obama and the West December 26, 2016

Obama and the West

In our last issue of the year, we reflect on the presidency of Barack Obama and the stamp he's left on the West. Despite his inclination toward compromise and incremental progress, Obama may well be remembered as the first leader to seriously address the foremost environmental issue of our time: climate change.

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How the Park Service is Failing Women December 12, 2016

How the Park Service is Failing Women

In this issue, the culmination of a year-long investigation into sexual harassment and gender discrimination at federal public lands agencies by Lyndsey Gilpin, the magazine’s editorial fellow. Also, the uncertain future of Obama's legacy under Trump, a new way forward for Western farming and an end to coal terminals?

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A Weird and Perfect Wilderness November 28, 2016

A Weird and Perfect Wilderness

This issue examines the value of the West’s open spaces, its public lands, and its rich natural and cultural resources. In such places we find solace, as well as common values across cultural and political divides. In our cover story, Kate Schimel, the magazine’s digital editor, visits a “wilderness for weirdoes,” asking what it means to love such a place, Correspondent Sarah Tory takes us to the Bonneville Salt Flats, where a piece of Americana, 12,000 years in the making, is crumbling rapidly away and essayist Peter Friederici examines our complicity in the realities of climate change.

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The Long View November 14, 2016

The Long View

Our special, once-a-year, Books and Authors issue focuses on coming to terms with legacies of the past — and looking forward to where the West is headed. Featuring new writing by Terry Tempest Williams and Aaron A. Abeyta, plus interviews with Kim Stanley Robinson and Stephen Graham Jones, this edition peers deeper into questions that shape Western identity.

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A Monumental Divide October 31, 2016

A Monumental Divide

In the fight over a Bears Ears national monument, complicated questions arise about who has a claim on the land. Also in this issue, logging battles in Canada and Alaska and climate change's threat to a beloved berry.

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Purple Rain October 03, 2016

Purple Rain

As Election Day looms, High Country News takes a look at Trump's disruptive effect. From mobilizing undocumented immigrants to unsettling Mormon Country, Trump's rhetoric is permanently recoloring Western politics.

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Frontera Incognita September 19, 2016

Frontera Incognita

In our special issue Frontera Incognita, High Country News revisits the Borderlands. The Borderlands, as our collection of stories show, means different things to different people. We explore the many relationships people have with our country's perimeter.

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When the Doctor is Out September 05, 2016

When the Doctor is Out

Why disappearing rural hospitals spell trouble for the Central Valley. In this special feature, High Country News looks at the troubled rural Western healthcare system. Plus, when to say yes to invasive plants, Alaska’s overtaxed firefighters and New Mexico’s oldest climate correspondent.

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100 August 22, 2016

100

The heat is rising on the National Park Service. In our special report: How climate change is altering the country's beloved parks and the agency's centennial has brought with it harsh scrutiny on issues of race and gender. Plus, nuclear power divides CA and a trip down the Grand.

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Line of Descent August 08, 2016

Line of Descent

In New Mexico, a stalemate between federal and state wildlife officials leaves the state's wolves in peril. Plus, a review of Jim Harrison's last book and a seed bank that will help researchers trace the effects of climate change.

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Salmon Power July 25, 2016

Salmon Power

How salmon has become a battleground over sovereignty for Alaska tribes. Plus, dampening Glen Canyon Dam's effects, the dangers of drones and the Northwest's new battle over logging.

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The New Advocates June 27, 2016

The New Advocates

Meet the new environmental advocates, a diverse generation of outdoor enthusiasts and activists forging their way in the conservation movement. In this special issue, eco-minded veterans, Latinos rising, and Hopi raft guides.

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Water to Dust June 13, 2016

Water to Dust

Oregon’s obscure terminal lakes feed millions of migrating birds, but now they need life support of their own. Plus, disenfranchised Native Americans in Utah and Arizona's tough water choices.

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Trial by Fire May 30, 2016

Trial by Fire

Trial by fire: Female firefighters still face harassment, abuse and sexism. Plus, cats on the border, shifts in the BLM and a roadtripping lawyer.

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Grizzly Face-Off May 16, 2016

Grizzly Face-Off

What the future holds for the Yellowstone grizzly. Plus, cities sue Monsanto, the secrets of Western trees, and coal lessons from Europe.

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