A new way to understand 60s counterculture

A collection of personal stories and photos documents alternative lifestyles in the Southwest.

  • Robin Melville, her baby and her daughter Nava at Pyramid Lake, Nevada, 1967.

    Courtesy of the Lisa Law Production Archives
  • Reno Kleen Myerson and Steve Samuels building a tipi in northern New Mexico, 1967.

    Courtesy of the Lisa Law Production Archives
  • Interior of dome at Lama, a spiritual community near Taos, New Mexico.

    Seth Roffman
  • New Buffalo kitchen area during construction of the main house in Arroyo Hondo, New Mexico, 1967.

    Courtesy of the Lisa Law Production Archives
  • Tom Law pitching a tipi at Woodstock, 1969.

    Courtesy of the Lisa Law Production Archives
  • David Monongye at his home in Hotevilla, Third Mesa, Hopi Independent Nation, Arizona, 1970s.

    Seth Roffman
  • “The Longest Walk,” a cross-country walk to draw attention to anti-Indian legislation, 1978.

    Seth Roffman

 

As Peter Coyote points out in his contribution to Voices of the Counterculture in the Southwest, providing fresh insights into the heavily chronicled 1960s and ’70s is not easy. But through personal stories and thoughtful reflection, this new book seeks to highlight the ways that the countercultural narratives of that era, many of which played out across the sage-dotted deserts of the American Southwest, have seeped into and deeply influenced our own.

Though some of the means have changed — with underground newspapers replaced by social media — many of the issues rippling through society half a century later hark back to that earlier time, as racism, violence and environmental crises provoke new calls to “resist.” Amid all this, as Meredith Davidson writes, “It seems we are once again seeking a more wholesome approach to living and an awareness of something greater than ourselves.”

Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest
Edited by Jack Loeffler and Meredith Davidson
208 pages, hardcover: $34.95.
Museum of New Mexico Press, 2017.