Magazine
No Hoax
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September 18, 2017

In this issue, we confront the realities of climate change as its impacts on the West begin to unfold. We explore the longer growing seasons in Alaska, the fragility of shellfish in an increasingly acidified ocean and the impact of extreme weather events on indigenous people, and what they’re doing about it. With an administration at odds with recognizing climate change, it’s even more important to see what efforts are being made at the grass roots level.

Feature

As oceans acidify, shellfish farmers respond
As oceans acidify, shellfish farmers respond
Scientists collaborate to mitigate climate impacts in the Northwest.

Current

Can coal remain the bedrock of Wyoming’s economy?
Can coal remain the bedrock of Wyoming’s economy?
As companies experiment with “clean coal,” cheaper and cleaner fuels are taking over.
Tribes commit to uphold Paris climate agreement
Tribes commit to uphold Paris climate agreement
Western nations take action on climate change — and push for self-governance.
A salmon festival portends struggles on the Klamath River
A salmon festival portends struggles on the Klamath River
The Yurok Tribe has again halted fishing during the chinook’s fall run.
Why the Bundys win; coal could catch a break; Snake River revisited
The Seri adapt to climate change in the desert
The Seri adapt to climate change in the desert
Researchers are working to document traditional ecological knowledge.
Farming in Alaska is increasingly possible
Farming in Alaska is increasingly possible
Longer growing seasons and food scarcity are turning more people to agriculture.
Religious communities are taking on climate change
Religious communities are taking on climate change
Churches that have long played a role in social justice are stepping up.

Editor's Note

Climate change is our new reality
Climate change is our new reality
A summer of hurricanes, flooding and wildfires made it clear: the climate is changing.

Uncommon Westerners

In Glen Canyon, a fight against invasive grasses
In Glen Canyon, a fight against invasive grasses
A young researcher seeks to make the Southwest more resilient to climate change.

Dear Friends

Autumn calls, and visitors keep rolling in
Autumn calls, and visitors keep rolling in
Eclipse seekers stop by, and we begin a new tree-saving initiative.

Book Reviews

Vignettes of vessels crafted in the Southwest
Vignettes of vessels crafted in the Southwest
Photos display an array of pottery made by Native American artists.

Heard Around the West

Gun-toting cats; bird killers; plastic bottles return
Gun-toting cats; bird killers; plastic bottles return
Mishaps and mayhem from around the region.

Letters