See wind power’s eerie beauty

A new exhibit, Harnessing the Wind, looks at Western landscapes now marked by wind turbines.

  • Wind turbines on the Pattern Energy Spring Valley wind site in Spring Valley, Nevada, situated on 7,680 acres of BLM administered land.

    Deon Reynolds
  • Wind turbines on the Pattern Energy Spring Valley wind site in Spring Valley, Nevada, situated on 7,680 acres of BLM administered land.

    Deon Reynolds
  • Wind turbines on the Pattern Energy Spring Valley wind site in Spring Valley, Nevada, situated on 7,680 acres of BLM administered land.

    Deon Reynolds
  • Wind turbines on the Pattern Energy Ocotillo Wind facility northwest of Ocotillo, California, situated on 12,500 acres of BLM administered land.

    Deon Reynolds
  • Wind turbines on the Pattern Energy Ocotillo Wind facility northwest of Ocotillo, California, situated on 12,500 acres of BLM administered land.

    Deon Reynolds

 

In Harnessing the Wind, Deon Reynolds captures something rarely shown in photographs: the force of the wind, as well as the eerie beauty of the turbines that channel its power. Reynolds recently donated his photos of three wind power facilities to the Nevada Museum of Art’s Center for Art + Environment. In them, lonely white sentinels watch over grassy prairies, rainstorms and mountain ranges, alone and in groups against dramatic backdrops in Nevada, California and Texas. Reynolds says he hopes the collection will open people’s eyes to renewable energy, helping them to see the positive effects and potential beauty of incorporating this technology into Western landscapes. The center’s director, William Fox, says Reynolds’ photos “reveal the intricate engineering behind wind turbines while capturing the character of the places in which they stand.” That, he says, is a “delicate and rare balance.”

Harnessing the Wind
by Deon Reynolds
Center for Art + Environment Archive Collections, Nevada Museum of Art