Photographs of America’s pronghorn antelope

Review of “A Pronghorn Year” by Dick Kettlewell.

  • Pronghorn are largely diurnal, meaning they are most active during daylight hours—mornings and early evenings in particular—like this buck framed by a rising moon.

    Dick Kettlewell
  • Curled with ears down flat against its neck, this buck fawn is completely motionless, not unlike the lump of buffalo chips he’s lying beside.

    Dick Kettlewell
  • A mixed-gender group feeds on a winter hillside slope.

    Dick Kettlewell
  • During winter, resting or reclining pronghorn will generally select a downward slope and orient with their backs to the north’s chilling winds.

    Dick Kettlewell
  • Running at dusk.

    Dick Kettlewell
 

A Pronghorn Year, Dick Kettlewell, 80 pages, softcover: $14.95.
Farcountry Press, 2014.

In A Pronghorn Year, Dick Kettlewell celebrates the speed and grace of America’s pronghorn antelope. Kettlewell notes that though pronghorn aren’t technically antelope — the name is a misnomer left over from European explorers — they also aren’t part of the deer family. In fact, they’re most closely related to goats, though they certainly don’t move like them: Pronghorn are the fastest land animals in North America and second only to the African cheetah worldwide. (Hence the nickname “speed goat.”) Kettlewell is mesmerized by the animals, describing their movement as “perfection witnessed.” His enthusiasm, captured in his photographs, is wonderfully contagious.