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Topic: Flora & Fauna     Department: Letters

Collared collateral damage?

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My father pioneered research on California quail in the 1940s, long before telemetry technology of any kind was available ("Wildlife Biology Goes High-Tech," HCN, 12/10/12). I served as a small-aircraft pilot to monitor collared wolves, and to count animals from the air. More recently, I volunteered to help with a greater sage grouse study in eastern Montana. I believe the less direct contact scientists have with studied animals, the better it is for the animals. It seems to me that the mortality rate for collared animals, once they are released, exceeds that for animals that have never been touched by human hands. Something for researchers to ponder, or maybe even study.

Wendy Beye
Roundup, Montana

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