The gospel according to Ron Gillett

Fiery advocate against wolves connects with a small farm town

  • Ron Gillett JUSTIN JACKSON/TIMES_NEWS

  • The "Myths"page of saveourelk.com shows graphic photos similar to this one and videos of wolves making kills. "We don't show the cute little puppy dog approach the 'Save the Wolf' folks like to spin,"it says. HANS PROPPE, ISTOCKPHOTO.COM

 

ASHTON, IDAHO

 The West's traveling anti-wolf evangelist, Ron Gillett, brought his crusade to this rural community a couple of weeks ago.

It's a good venue for him. Hundred-pound wolves prowl among people and livestock and elk around here, on the western border of Yellowstone National Park, stirring up waves of fear and anger.

In mid-April, naked dirt showed in the farm fields, and the higher-elevation public lands held the ruins of winter in melting snowdrifts. The town of Ashton is nothing fancy, just a few blocks of small businesses and a scatter of houses around a stand of grain elevators.

About 120 of the locals turned out to see Gillett on a chilly Thursday evening. They parked mud-splattered pickups and SUVs at the Ashton Community Center and along side streets, by the Log Cabin Motel and the Zion Lutheran Church. As they filed into the metal-roofed, brick-walled community center, the sky glowed with sunset. A nearly full moon was rising, and the snowy tips of the Tetons brightened the horizon. The sound of cattle bawling came from a nearby feedlot.

In the main room - a wood-floored basketball court - the crowd filled rows of metal folding chairs and stood along the walls. They were all ages, gray-haired down to infants, some women but mostly men, in farmers' caps and cowboy hats, sweatshirts and jackets, jeans and boots.

The furnace hadn't been turned on, so it was cold in the room. But Gillett, a beefy guy, was in short-sleeves, his baby-blue T-shirt decorated with a macabre scene of bloody-jawed wolves around a torn-apart elk. Sheaves of silver hair stuck out from under his straw cowboy hat, and silver medallions shone on his wristwatch band. He positioned himself at the front of the crowd, and as he began speaking, things warmed up.

"I'm not gonna let anyone sleep in here tonight," he said. "I'm pretty passionate about this wolf thing."

Raising his voice, sometimes almost shouting, jabbing a finger to emphasize his points, he spoke for an hour and a half.

He delivered his message with the fervor of a fundamentalist preacher: Wolves must be removed from Idaho! Immediately! Because they're killing too many elk and other prey, and soon they'll kill people!

"It makes me fighting mad!" he roared.

The crowd listened politely, with the reserve of country people, and yet most seemed to agree with Gillett's tirade.

There are reasons why the "reintroduction" of wolves to the Northern Rockies continues to rankle people.

The 66 Canadian wolves brought to Idaho and Yellowstone National Park in 1995-1996 have multiplied to more than 1,500 - an Endangered Species Act victory, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and environmentalists. But as wolves have spread through Montana, Wyoming and Idaho, with bone-crushing bites, they've killed hundreds of ranchers' cows, plus sheep, horses, dogs, and tens of thousands of wild elk and other game.

In response, government wildlife agents have executed hundreds of wolves, mostly by aerial shotgunning, to appease ranchers and elk hunters.

And lately it's gotten easier to kill wolves. The feds removed the Northern Rockies wolf population from the endangered species list March 28, shifting management to state agencies, which have more liberal rules. That set off an unofficial killing spree. By the time Gillett came to Ashton, 20 days after the feds pulled back, citizen shooters had killed at least nine wolves in Wyoming, in areas where that state government classifies wolves as pests. Montana had at least one unofficial wolf-killing in that period, and in Idaho there had been at least three.

Near Ashton, wolves had killed dogs at two homes April 9, and a dog owner responded with gunshots (results unknown). Another guy said two wolves threatened his herd of horses. He told Channel 8 TV news in Idaho Falls that the wolves "came up to his cabin, got into the dog dish, pulled out blankets and then circled" the cabin. He shot and killed one wolf, then fired up a snowmobile and chased the other more than a mile and killed it as well.

A murky new law - Idaho Code 36-1107, subsections (b) and (c) - says anyone can kill wolves without a permit, if the wolves are "molesting" livestock or pets. "Molesting" is defined as "the actions of a wolf that are annoying, disturbing or persecuting, especially with hostile intent or injurious effect, or chasing, driving, flushing, worrying, following after or on the trail of, or stalking or lying in wait for, livestock or domestic animals."

The Idaho Fish and Game Department wanted a misdemeanor charge against the snowmobiler for killing the second wolf - a possible $1,000 fine. The local prosecutor declined to file the charge.

Idaho plans to let hunters kill wolves, for the first time ever, this fall - selling wolf tags for $11.50. But that's not enough for Gillett and his allies. They want to get an initiative on the November ballot that would let Idaho voters decide whether to remove almost all wolves from the state. Under two banners - the Idaho Anti-Wolf Coalition and Save Our Elk - they were circulating petitions, trying to collect at least 45,893 signatures by May 1. If they missed that deadline, Gillett told the crowd, they would immediately begin a new petition drive. "We don't care if you nuke 'em or poison 'em," Gillett said, "as long as they're gone!"

The license plate on Gillett's truck says NO WOLFS. He rattled off his credentials: His grandfather was a sheepherder, his father was a cattle rancher, and he's been an outfitter. He rents cabins to hunters on his land outside tiny Stanley, Idaho. And he's been campaigning against wolves for more than a decade.

He's threatened lawsuits against the government (which didn't get filed), pushed an anti-wolf resolution through the Legislature (which had no real effect), and tried a previous petition drive (which didn't succeed). His wife got seriously ill with multiple sclerosis, and he offered to lay off the wolves to spend more time with her. She told him to keep at it. On this petition drive, he'd traveled "more than 5,000 miles in the last six weeks." The stress may be getting to him: He'd recently pled not guilty to a misdemeanor assault charge, arising from an altercation with a pro-wolf woman.

More highlights of his talk: A wolf kills 16 to 24 elk and deer per year, just for food! They engage in "sport binge killing" - and they'll wipe out competing predators, such as bobcats and lynx! They'll dig up a hibernating bear and kill it! Wolves "are the most cruel, vicious animal in North America ... the only predator that eats its prey alive because they like the taste of warm blood!" Enviros - the "wolf-thug terrorist groups"- are full of  "crap" and "baloney" when they claim wolves have little impact. "When they turned wolves loose, they were having toasts that hunting in Idaho would soon be over!"

He even said one of his arch-enemies - Idaho Fish and Game's top wolf manager, Steve Nadeau - "would love an alpha female wolf for a girlfriend!"

Then he got out an anti-wolf poem and read it to the crowd. He didn't mention that other anti-wolf groups - including the Idaho Outfitters and Guides Association and the Idaho Cattle Association - don't support his petition. They think that if it passes, the federal government will just take over again, re-imposing tougher protections for wolves. (That may happen anyway: A dozen enviro groups, worried about the increased wolf-killing, filed suit April 28, demanding that the feds restore the protections.)

Gillett called the politics "a mess" and seemed to double-dare the feds and enviros to come at him. He held up the front page of the Sun Valley newspaper, the Idaho Mountain Express, which had a photo of one of the resort town's councilmen getting licked in the face by a tame wolf.  "Brainwashing!" he said. "They have elevated the wolf to a godlike status!"

Wolves do pose more of a threat to people, as well as to elk and other prey, than most enviros admit. The Web site for Save Our Elk features TV news reports about wolves threatening hikers in Alaska in 2007 and biting a Canadian camper in 2000 (the victim needed 50 stitches to close his head wound). Investigating another attack, a Canadian coroner's jury concluded that wolves killed Kenton Carnegie in 2006 in Saskatchewan.

Wolves that are "habituated" to people - for food scraps, for instance - tend to be the culprits. But Valerius Geist, a respected Canadian animal behaviorist whose studies Gillett often cites, says it's time to end the "harmless-wolf myth." Geist says North American wolves had grown "extremely shy" of people, after decades of being poisoned and shot and trapped. Now, however, they're less afraid, and more likely to attack. Geist says he had to shoot a couple of wolves a few years ago in self-defense. Wolves kill people in places like Russia, Iraq, Iran and Afghanistan, Geist adds; why should we expect to fare differently?

Even Gillett's nemesis, Nadeau, thinks wolves may soon be biting people in Idaho, at least occasionally. Nadeau also says Gillett's estimate of the number of elk eaten by wolves is fairly accurate. But Nadeau thinks Gillett's reports of massive binge killing are exaggerated. After 13 years of reintroduced wolves, Idaho still has about 125,000 elk. The total may be declining slightly, and in some areas, local elk populations are noticeably down. Nadeau blames drought, wildfires and habitat loss, as well as wolves.

Geist says the anti-wolf campaign misrepresents his conclusions. He still thinks "wolves have a place" in the Northern Rockies. He believes wolves should be preserved in large areas of good habitat, like national parks. Outside the preserves, he advocates increased hunting, and the killing of "misbehaving" wolves, to teach other wolves to avoid people, and to limit the toll on elk. Gillett lacks that kind of nuance. He told the crowd about his recent encounter with three "wolf-lovers," and said, "I hope they've floated up in Payette Lake by now - there's about to be some Idaho justice!"

Some people chuckled. No one stood up and said, that's not funny!

When Gillett finished his talk, the crowd applauded. He passed out petitions, and people took them eagerly, setting out to collect signatures. And they lined up to buy the campaign's bumper stickers - $3 each, or two for $5 - that were emblazoned with a slogan promoting wolf-killing: "Smoke a Pack a Day."


The author is HCN's senior editor.
Anonymous
May 09, 2008 07:30 PM

Thanks for keeping us informed.  As hard as it is to hear about kooks like this, we need to know the scope of the debate.  Unfortunately the other extreme is just about as bad.

I personally advocate a return of bison.  If we are to have a truly balanced ecosystem, the keystone species should certainly be a part of it.

Nutbag...
maxx
maxx
Jun 02, 2010 06:14 PM
The guy is a nutbag, and NO the other side is not 'justa as bad', because they are not talking about nor advocating violence against this guy as he does against them. Just because there are two sides does not mean they are equal and deserve equal time or equal respect.

What next? Should we 'respect' the opinion of 'responsible drunk driving' or Richard Cheney-like 'responsible drunk hunting'? This guy is out to lunch he takes what could be a reasonable discussion and turns it into a religious televangelists money making tour, much like the televangelist Glenn Beck on a smaller scale.
Anonymous
May 10, 2008 07:11 AM

Shame on HCN for giving this "man" and his cause free press! I hope the editors realize that by running this story they are assisting Gillett promote his agenda of lies and misinformation.  Perhaps you might next consider inviting Rush Limbaugh to write a guest editorial on global warming?  There is a high probability that it would be more informative and factual than Gillett's utter nonsense.  I've come to expect better from HCN.

kimmot1
kimmot1
May 10, 2008 01:10 PM

It is amazing how one can stand up before a crowd of people and use name calling and fear to start "vigilante" justice. 

Anonymous
May 12, 2008 11:31 AM

"The Idaho Fish and Game Department wanted a misdemeanor charge against the snowmobiler for killing the second wolf - a possible $1,000 fine. The local prosecutor declined to file the charge."  Well good for him, when the heck did this species become more important than human safety and human freedoms?  I do not see anywhere in the bill of rights where it says subject to wolf well being. 

 To take domesticated pet wolves into schools with the sole purpose to teach childrern to believe they are different than they really are is indoctrination of the innocent and that is very scary.  It is how emperialist regimes get started.  Worse, there is no counterbalance to these presentations to show the biology or the behaviors of the real animal nor their impact on humans.

Ron Gillett may be abrasive to some but his message points are extremely valid. Human beings should never be unduly impacted by any animal it is bad for the animal species and horrible for the human element.    Other wildlife species should be protected from unmitigated impacts from predators it isn't just about one species of predator in nature, why are wolf lovers so biggoted against anything not wolf?

It is terrifying to me that most folks on this board are so unwilling to listen to any opinion other than their own.  What on earth is happening in this country we are entering the twilight zone. 

 

 

Snowmobiling to kill a wolf
maxx
maxx
Jun 02, 2010 06:32 PM
I started hunting well before I was old enough to get a hunting license. We learned back then (in the 1960s) hunting is NOT using cars and other gadgets to track down and murder the animal no matter how much you might want to for some kind of revenge nor because it is easy. E.g. 'hunting' from helicopters is just being a pig IMO or 'hunting' where someone else beats the game to you like the elites 'hunt' is disgusting IMO since any fat pig can 'hunt' like that. There may have been a time for that in the distant past when we needed the game for survival, but no more.

You do not jump on a snowmobile and chase a critter for a mile wearing it down via a machine to shoot it, that s/b prosecuted IMO. He had already driven off the critter and killed the other for pete's sake. These critters whether we may like it or not do belong in Idaho more so than cattle which were imported to ID.
Anonymous
May 12, 2008 12:10 PM

Well, now we have Ron and "respected" Valerius quoting wolf horror stories coming out of such trustworthy and enlightened news sources as old Soviet Russia, Iraq, Iran, and Afghanistan.  My goodness, are we now to believe that these "respected" authorities would give the same credibility to all the other stories coming out of these regions and governments during those days?  Is not a credible source a credible source or do we get to cherry-pick our information and what we consider reliable?

We now have a couple of tales coming out of Canada about wolf attacks; are these stories as reliable as say the tales coming out of Catron County?  There have been a lot of wolves and a lot of humans living in Canada over the past couple of hundred years; are these two, three, or four stories the extent of the record over all that time?  How about Minnesota?  There are a lot of wolves in Minnesota mingling with a lot of humans.  There can't be a much more vulnerable prey than a drunk hoser staggering around an ice fishing shed and there are sure a lot of those every winter, precisely when the packs are grouped most tightly for large game and when the wolves are coldest and hungriest.  If wolves are such dangers, wouldn't the Coen Brothers have done a "wolves come to Fargo" movie by now?

The truth is that the most dangerous of all canine problems are the pitbulls running around most every city's streets and, ironically, guys like Ron are probably the first to defend the right to own them.  

Anonymous
May 12, 2008 12:12 PM

maybe all these "knowing folk" who don't like wild animals should move out of Idaho, to prehaps New York, Los angeles, or some other big town where they won't have to accept the fact that all these good animals were here long before you folks arrived. Leave them alone, I live in Idaho and was raised 80 some yrs ago right across the line in Oregon We didn't have a bunch of cry babies!! study up on your Wolves. there are a lot of good books by people that know the Wolf. J Turck, Idaho City

Anonymous
May 12, 2008 12:13 PM

I have lived in Colorado and Idaho for a total of 10 years. I know returned to the Midwest to help my parents age, and find a more affordable place to live.

This article enrages me. Typical manifest destiny and divine right thinking. There are a number of similar animals threatening human life in the city here in Columbus such as racoons, crows, spiders and deer. I think we need Mr. Gillet to come to fair city and exterminate all of these species which directly and indirectly threaten our "safety". Wouldn't it be great to live in a place where only humans existed (lol)....is that even possible?

Anonymous
May 12, 2008 12:15 PM

This anti-wolf stuff keeps floating to the surface every few years by self-styled experts who claim local, intimate knowledge of wolves.  I became weary of that crap more 30 years ago.  Ron Gillette and like-minded people, never will see anything but their own misguided point of view.  Neither did the polish immigrant who took up cattle ranching in northern Minnesota in wolf country when I lived in that area in the late 1970s. I have heard the same tune as this guide/outfitter from other like him who blame wolves for declining elk, deer (you name it!) and ignorant tree huggers, "most o f them . . . in New York City".  They live in the big sky country,  so they think they know it all and no outsider knows squat.  They never seem to consider that maybe poaching by local residents, and local ranchers in particular, along with chronic wasting disease today and normal cyclical variations might be at work.  And gosh, maybe all the elk that this outfitter and his hunters killed in prior years . . . could that have been a factor?  Nope, had to be the wolves. 

 

Funny is it not, that most American Indians did not hold such animosity for wolves, or other predators, but modern know-it all-locals who, of course, know more than those Fish & Game guys, think that game species can be maintained and kept healthy without natural predators. 


When I lived in western Canada in the 1970s, a local rancher outside Red Deer, Alberta asked us hunters not to shoot "his cougar" if we saw it.  This rancher had prize winning sheep, and numerous horses and cattle where that cougar roamed, and where there were also native wolf packs.  Maybe Canadian livestock and ranchers just don't get the picture Gillette is painting.  And yes, there were plenty of deer and elk on that ranch too.  Healthy deer and elk.


 

Anonymous
May 12, 2008 12:16 PM

A BIG thank you to High Country for running this article! 

Many rural people don't realize it, but we're under a severe attack designed to drive us into those 'sustainable communities' in cities where we'll be more easily controlled as a herd. 

Dumping and allowing the breeding of predators to drive us out of our homes, is just one prong of the attack.  I'm sickened by the push to drop grizzlies into north central Washington in addition to them allowing cougars to breed like sewer rats.  Between wolves, grizzlies and cougars, dumped in our backyard, along with fuel prices that will cripple our ability to work, and live in rural areas, coupled with the property rights stealing sustainable development agenda,
they figure we'll eventually give up and move to the cities. I even see the government manipulated rising gas prices as part of the attack.  (how many in the rural areas will be able to survive working and traveling to work?)  That's not even going into the factor of food, merchandise, feed, etc., being trucked into rural areas, along with farm equipment
using fuel and farmers trying to survive.

At any rate, all I've got is high praises for High Country News and Ron Gillett.  People need to be aware of this agenda to drive us out and they need to start fighting
back.

Alice

Okanogan, WA

Anonymous
May 12, 2008 12:18 PM


I have lived in Colorado and Idaho for a total of 10 years. I know returned to the Midwest to help my parents age, and find a more affordable place to live.



This article enrages me. Typical manifest destiny and divine right thinking. There are a number of similar animals threatening human life in the city here in Columbus such as racoons, crows, spiders and deer. I think we need Mr. Gillet to come to fair city and exterminate all of these species which directly and indirectly threaten our "safety". Wouldn't it be great to live in a place where only humans existed (lol)....is that even possible?


Anonymous
Aug 13, 2008 09:46 AM

Ron Gillette is one of the most misguided, misinformed old school rednecks Idaho still has. The fact that you wasted this many columns of space on him is truly a shame. The guy hasn't a legitimate leg to stand on. He was one of the worst river outfitters on the Middle Fork Salmon, and I can't imagine anyone wanting to use him as a hunting outfitter. His crediblity sorely lacks on virtually any topic, in particular wolf reintroduction. He does not represent most of the people I know who live and work in the Stanley basin, and he certainly doesn't represent most Idahoans, me included.

Wolves are bringing back in balance an ecosytem to which they most assuredly deserve to be a part of and were historically. And since we're now shooting them as game animals, I want to know what those hunters are going to do with the meat? My parents taught me you don't kill animals unless you are doing so for food.

Oh,and while we're on the topic, what country did Ron Gillette come from? Unless he migrated here over the Siberian straits with the first Americans he needs to put to rest this garbage about "Canadian wolves".

Think about it...
Lenalaw
Lenalaw
May 15, 2010 01:41 PM
Ok, answer me this question: Who was here first, us or wolves? Exactly! We came AFTER wolves. They were here first, but then we came and drove them out, killed them, hunted them, destroyed their habitat, killed thier family, and many other things. Most of you are saying you don't like how they are starting to come into our homes and such. Well, that's what we did to them. I think most of you forget the Golden Rule, "Do onto others, as you would want them to do onto you." Nowhere in that quote does it say, "Do onto PEOPLE, as you would want PEOPLE to do onto you." It says nothing about people. It says 'others'. Whether you like it or not, we don't rule the world. It's not our world. It's the animals AND our world. Another thing is that by hunting multiple animals, you're hunting your ancestors. Would you go to your grandma and shoot her because she was eating your food? No, I don't think so. So why do it to your ancestors? Humans are a different species, just like whales and bears aren't the same species, but we are related to animals. We ARE animals! We aren't any better than them. If we were, would we really be hunting them right now? And just because we have had about 10 attacks in one year, we decide to kill them. Imagine yourself as one of the alphas in the pack. It's a nice, sunny day, with chirping birds and a lovely breeze on the wind. Your with your family of five, you and yourmate, and your three six-month-old pups. You're just walking towards an open meadow to find some rabbit, or snack to feed on. Suddenly, out of the forest behind you, you hear a deep, rumbling sound. Out of your home comes a huge, moving, metal 'animal'. It has spikes on a moving head in the front. Behind it are people. In their hands they have chain saws. You immediately try to save your pups, but turn to find one of them ran over by the metal 'animal'. The other two and immediately running into the forest to get to their home, the den. Before you can save them, you hear a loud, SNAp sound, and seem one of them drop dead, shot by a hunter. The other turns to run back towards you, but a tree nearby falls, and lands on it.
       Now, remember that, and how that would make you feel if that happened to you and your family. Remembering that, remember that you're voting to do the same to them because they are 'annoying' you, or 'coming close' to your cattle. If that happens to your family, remember that by doing onto others, they will do onto you as you did onto them.
Anonymous
May 12, 2008 01:09 PM

The so called "tales" coming from Catron County are real life and the human habituated Mexican gray wolves have made a huge impact on many of our area ranchers and are taking a bigger and bigger toll on our elk every day. Sport killing of calf elk seem to be one of their signature behaviours.

Maybe you out to read up on the research that Valerius has done in these foreign countries, to get the real picture on the dangers wolves pose, which is very different than the pro wolf pushers care to admit to.

Until you have been there maybe you better keep your yap shut. I didn't really think about how dangerous they really are until last fall when they came into my hunting camp and thought that my highlined mules and horses looked like a smorgashboard. When we got between them and the horses thay really set up a yapping, howling, snapping and growling racket. It took along time before they finally decided to leave. It frankley scared the loving beJesus out of us.

Mexican Wolves
Patrick
Patrick
Jun 18, 2009 02:38 AM
There are less than 50 Mexican Wolves in the wild in total. I find it very hard to believe that the depredation could be so high.

There are many things in Mr. Gillett's speech that are simply not true, among them wolves digging up and eating hibernating bears, and ESPECIALLY wolves having a bloodlust. Wolves do not routinely kill bobcat or lynx. In fact, the only predator that wolves kill in any quantity are coyotes, and then only because coyotes frequently steal from wolf kills. 'Sport binge killing' is the biggest load of crap I've ever heard. This 'man' really needs to get his facts straight.
Anonymous
May 14, 2008 12:13 PM

I really think this guy is off his rocker. I am from Michigan, we have wolves here, and we have elk, deer, and moose as well, and there is a great balance in nature. To chase a wolf down on a snowmoblie and kill it! WOW, in Michigan this guy would have paid a fine and lose his hunting rights! Such cowards are people like this. We, humans have moved into there world! The wolves and all the rest of the wildlife did just fine before we came into the wilderness. What a shame that people are so narrow minded.

Anonymous
May 19, 2008 06:27 PM

Ron Gillett and Tony Mayer (of Saveourelk.com) peddle the same hate-filled rhetoric. It seems quite ironic to me that they fume at people from "out of state" meddling in Idaho affairs, and then their petitions fail because half of the people who've signed them aren't involved enough to even be registered as voters in the state. For a more rational view on wolves, http://www.IdahoWolves.org Finally, on this issue of "Canadian" wolves, I wrote Joy Gold, Technical Information Specialist at the Smithsonian Institute's Department of Vertebrate Zoology, asking about the impact of reintroduced wolf genetics on prey species in a given area. Here reply was: "Any new population of wolves or other animals might have genetic differences but it is extremely unlikely that genetic difference would have any effect on the deer and elk population. We do need to have predators as part of a balanced ecosystem." Wolves will eventually be managed, yes. What Ron Gillett, Tony Mayer and all those involved with the Idaho Anti-Wolf Coalition isn't management. It's quite simply human behavior at its worst.

Anonymous
May 21, 2008 12:37 PM

Wolves were here before the white man, we were the ones who introduced the wolf back into the area, the native Americans were able to live with them, why can't we?  Find a way to co-exist or we will all become extinct.  Just because an animal or a person does not fit into the scheme of someone's mold (like this crazy man's ideas) does not mean it is bad.  Does he have anything positive to say or to try and do to rectify the situation with the wolves without killing them?  I am mortified that this article was allowed to run in this publication!!!!

Anonymous
May 21, 2008 12:45 PM

shoot,shovel and shutup......words to live by........

Jamey Redway
Jamey Redway
Feb 02, 2012 11:46 AM
To all the people that agree with Ron Gillette's anti-wolf campaign.
i watched this talk on youtube recently, and would just like to say his facts are wrong. a point that really took me was that wolves were decried as 'the animals of the devil' and they kill everything, even larger predators. wolves firstly don't kill other predators such as bears and mountain lions, as he described. they are very powerful predators yes, but they are also very wise, and know that a attack on animals such as these will threaten the live of their packs and themselves. this man is choosing his words to make us believe that wolves are evil, that all wolves do is kill and attack anything they can. if any animals on the planet are vicious blood thirsty monsters, it would be humans. humans have always had a desire to kill and control. a wolf is another animal on this planet, and just like another animal deserves a rightful place on this earth. we believe that we can tame and control the ecosystem, which is correct to a certain extent, but it is not the right thing todo. wolves, like all animals depend on us for survival.the wolf needs us more than ever and we have driven them to live in fear away from us, because of campaigns such as these. the lack of deer and elk, can be for many reasons, but instead of thinking about other possible suspects such as coyotes and mountain lions, we immediately blame the wolf. why? because it is people like this who help give the wolf a bad reputation, simply because wolves have been known in the past to attack live stock. these people would take the slightest opportunity to bring the wolf down.
i wil tell ou this now, wolves are not stupid. they know that the killing of livestock comes with possible risks. therefor, they are more likely to hunt elk or deer. and yet we still get annoyed at them for doing this. so really, we don't care, we just want them out.
i am 16 years old, soon to be 17, and am studying animal management at college. next year, i will be taking a conservation course, so that one day, i will be able to help stop people like this, and help the wolf. they are one the most beautiful animals on this earth. their pack structures and communication is far beyond anything we could understand, and are, in some cases, more compassionate than humans. people like Ron, need to wake up and look at what will happen to the world if we eliminated the wolf. the elk and deer population would rise out of control, leading to loss of vegetation in the parks and countryside we love today.
if the population of wolves is rising, we can think of many better solutions, which don't involve so much murder, to eliminate the problem. it is organisations such as Defenders of wildlife, which he practically decried as terrorists, who are trying to come up with non violent solutions to this 'problem'. i am a full supporter of them, and i hope to one day, work along side them. i hope you will listen to what i am saying, and support my view as well. thank you.
Jamey Redway
Jamey Redway
Feb 02, 2012 11:47 AM
To all the people that agree with Ron Gillette's anti-wolf campaign.
i watched this talk on youtube recently, and would just like to say his facts are wrong. a point that really took me was that wolves were decried as 'the animals of the devil' and they kill everything, even larger predators. wolves firstly don't kill other predators such as bears and mountain lions, as he described. they are very powerful predators yes, but they are also very wise, and know that a attack on animals such as these will threaten the live of their packs and themselves. this man is choosing his words to make us believe that wolves are evil, that all wolves do is kill and attack anything they can. if any animals on the planet are vicious blood thirsty monsters, it would be humans. humans have always had a desire to kill and control. a wolf is another animal on this planet, and just like another animal deserves a rightful place on this earth. we believe that we can tame and control the ecosystem, which is correct to a certain extent, but it is not the right thing todo. wolves, like all animals depend on us for survival.the wolf needs us more than ever and we have driven them to live in fear away from us, because of campaigns such as these. the lack of deer and elk, can be for many reasons, but instead of thinking about other possible suspects such as coyotes and mountain lions, we immediately blame the wolf. why? because it is people like this who help give the wolf a bad reputation, simply because wolves have been known in the past to attack live stock. these people would take the slightest opportunity to bring the wolf down.
i wil tell ou this now, wolves are not stupid. they know that the killing of livestock comes with possible risks. therefor, they are more likely to hunt elk or deer. and yet we still get annoyed at them for doing this. so really, we don't care, we just want them out.
i am 16 years old, soon to be 17, and am studying animal management at college. next year, i will be taking a conservation course, so that one day, i will be able to help stop people like this, and help the wolf. they are one the most beautiful animals on this earth. their pack structures and communication is far beyond anything we could understand, and are, in some cases, more compassionate than humans. people like Ron, need to wake up and look at what will happen to the world if we eliminated the wolf. the elk and deer population would rise out of control, leading to loss of vegetation in the parks and countryside we love today.
if the population of wolves is rising, we can think of many better solutions, which don't involve so much murder, to eliminate the problem. it is organisations such as Defenders of wildlife, which he practically decried as terrorists, who are trying to come up with non violent solutions to this 'problem'. i am a full supporter of them, and i hope to one day, work along side them. i hope you will listen to what i am saying, and support my view as well. thank you.