Magazine
Bred for success

November 13, 2006

The Peregrine Fund has mastered the art of breeding aplomado falcons and other endangered birds of prey, but critics say the organization is blind to the importance of wildlife habitat. Also in this issue: A recent court ruling on the ceremonial killing of eagles by American Indians collides with the Endangered Species Act, possibly sending the issue to the Supreme Court.

Feature

Bred for success
The Peregrine Fund has mastered the art of breeding aplomado falcons and other endangered birds of prey, but critics say the organization is blind to the importance of wildlife habitat

Editor's Note

The West is not a zoo
The Peregrine Fund has proven that it can breed and release endangered birds of prey as often as it needs to, but do we want to treat Western wildlife like a crop of annual flowers that has to be re-seeded every year?

Uncommon Westerners

State of Jefferson: A place apart
Brian Peterson considers himself the interim governor of the State of Jefferson, an area in Northern California and southern Oregon that has been talking about secession since the early 1940s

Essays

A decade of difficult questions
Outgoing High Country News editor Greg Hanscom muses on the stories and issues the paper has covered in the 10 years he’s been with it
A Proud Member of PAOBHA
Today’s rural West with its monster homes and Hummers sorely needs a group like PAOBHA, People Against Ostentatious and Boorish Housing

Dear Friends

Dear friends
HCN says goodbye to Greg Hanscom and welcomes new editor John Mecklin; notes from readers

News

Tribal religion trumps eagle protection
A recent court ruling on the ceremonial killing of eagles by American Indians collides with the Endangered Species Act, possibly sending the issue to the Supreme Court
Trees — A different shade of green
Increasingly, Western cities are planting trees to save energy as well as provide beauty
Spinning coal into gasoline
Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer is eager to build a synfuels plant to turn coal into diesel, but it will neither easy nor cheap to make gas gasification a reality in the West

Book Reviews

A whole lot of shaking
In his book A Crack in the Edge of the World, Simon Winchester takes a comprehensive look at the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and warns of the geological perils still facing the region
Elementary, my dear cowpuncher
In Steve Hockensmith’s historical mystery, Holmes on the Range, Montana cowboys inspired by the Sherlock Holmes stories try their hand at solving a murder
Four decades of the Sierra Club
Michael McCloskey’s autobiography, In the Thick of It: My Life in the Sierra Club, covers four decades of his life and work as an environmentalist

Heard Around the West

Heard around the West
Worms at work; stupid hunter tricks; fighting starlings with falcons; cemetery soccer; Schweitzer’s dang-tootin’; Mount Rushmoo

Two Weeks in the West

Two weeks in the West
Interior Deputy Secretary Julie MacDonald 'edited' Fish and Wildlife reports to change scientists’ conclusions; Platte River Cooperative Agreement comes together; railroad wants to blast avalanches in Glacier National Park; largest biodiesel refinery bein

Sidebar

Terms of endangerment
The Endangered Species Act’s categories of endangered, threatened, experimental essential, experimental nonessential, and safe harbor release are defined