Magazine
The Perpetual Growth Machine

June 12, 2006

Phoenix, Ariz., is determined to disprove the idea that the West will someday run out of water and that every boom has to come to an end. Also in this issue: Newly appointed Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne has a chance to use his deal-making abilities to bring change to the way Western public lands are managed.

Feature

The Perpetual Growth Machine
Phoenix, Ariz., is determined to disprove the idea that the West will someday run out of water and that every boom has to come to an end

Editor's Note

Adapt or collapse
In his book Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed, Jared Diamond warns about societies that overreach themselves – a warning that southern Arizona, in the midst of its tremendous real estate boom, ought to heed

Uncommon Westerners

'Miss Fish Hatchery'
Wildlife conservation biologist Jenn Logan has a soft spot for the less-glamorous endangered species like razorback suckers and boreal toads

Essays

Fishing ban will make us forget salmon
Fishing is not the reason behind the decline of the Northwest’s salmon; the desire for cheap hydroelectric power is
Empty pods and pleasant graveyards
In today’s surrealistic world, where language exists only to sell things, barren desert suburbs have names like "Lake Forest" and "WillowDale," while a graveyard is called "Pleasant Valley Cemetery."

Dear Friends

Dear friends
HCN seeks new editor as Greg Hanscom announces plans to leave; HCN goes to diversity school

News

Interior's new secretary — general or footsoldier?
Newly appointed Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne has a chance to use his deal-making abilities to bring change to the way Western public lands are managed
The Latest Bounce
Libby, Mont., asbestos victims now eligible for disability; new wind-power farm to come to Colorado; New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson petitions to protect his state’s roadless lands
On a wing and a prayer
The Gunnison sage grouse has been denied endangered species protection, and biologists like Clait Braun fear the species may be doomed
Tribes look to cash in with 'tree-market' environmentalism
The Nez Perce Tribe is trying to combat global warming – and make a few bucks – by planting trees for carbon dioxide sequestration
Mexican wolves face a rocky road to recovery
The recent deaths of 10 wolves in eastern Arizona are a wrenching example of everything that has gone wrong with the troubled Mexican wolf recovery program
Solar companies roll the dice
Two new companies have proposed building the largest solar power plant in the world near Deming, N.M.

Book Reviews

The noisy democracy of the West
The revised edition of Peter Decker’s Old Fences, New Neighbors examines the changes that population growth has brought to remote Ouray County in western Colorado
Trading goods, and stories, on the reservation
In Along Navajo Trails, Will Evans tells the stories of the Navajo Indians who came into his Shiprock Trading Post during the first part of the last century
Making room for wolves
In the anthology Comeback Wolves, 50 Western writers talk about the complex emotional – and practical – responses evoked by the return of this iconic predator

Heard Around the West

Heard around the West
Running shoes for immigrants; farming fun; Red Delicious apples weren’t; Utah’s only archaeology cop; Fiasco’s Mexican Grill; Codes of the West for urban newcomers

Letters