Magazine
How Long Will it Flow?

August 30, 2004

In Sierra Vista, Ariz., a partnership of developers, environmentalists and government agencies is trying to keep the San Pedro River alive, while at the same time allowing for continued growth in this burgeoning Sunbelt city. <P> ALSO IN THIS ISSUE: Assistant Interior Secretary Lynn Scarlett wants Congress to give the Bureau of Land Management increased incentive to sell off more public lands. <P>

Feature

A Thirst for Growth
In Sierra Vista, Ariz., a partnership of developers, environmentalists and government agencies is trying to keep the San Pedro River alive, while at the same time allowing for continued growth in this burgeoning Sunbelt city

Editor's Note

Turning water inside-out
Many Western cities like Sierra Vista, Ariz., were built beside once-beautiful rivers which were overused and then neglected, while the cities looked elsewhere for new water sources to exploit

Essays

Fees and our forests don't always fit
Idaho’s Republican senator says he can’t support the Recreation Fee Demonstration Program, which charges people to visit their own public lands
“W” in 2004: Taking stock of wilderness at 40
As we celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Wilderness Act, it’s time we got back to a realistic attitude about proposed wilderness, saving actual places, no matter how small they are, instead of holding out for mega-proposals

Dear Friends

Dear friends
HCN’s Gretchen Aston-Puckett and husband Jeremy Puckett announce the birth of Lydia Kestrel, and editor Greg Hanscom and Tara Thomas say hello to daughter Lucia; summertime visitors; Rock & Ice magazine agrees with HCN; and belated thanks to McCune Charit

News

Interior encourages BLM land sales
Assistant Interior Secretary Lynn Scarlett wants Congress to give the Bureau of Land Management increased incentive to sell off more public lands
Follow-up
EPA plans to streamline pesticide registration; Los Angeles puts the brakes on superstores; El Paso Corp. pushes to drill New Mexico’s Valle Vidal; and black-tailed prairie dog no longer a candidate for endangered species list
Will a mining-reform victory hold water in Nevada?
The "perpetual treatment" trust fund requirement faces its first challenge in Nevada, where the mining industry and the EPA disagree over how much money will be needed to treat long-lasting pollution at the Phoenix mine
Squirrels and scopes in the line of fire
A wildfire on Arizona’s Mount Graham almost reached the University of Arizona’s controversial mountaintop telescopes – and may yet destroy an already endangered squirrel
Ancient archaeological secret is revealed
Archaeologists are thrilled about the state of Utah’s acquisition of Waldo Wilcox’s Range Creek Canyon ranch, site of a thousand-year-old Frement Indian settlement
Racetrack
Proposed Montana ballot initiative preserves hunting and fishing rights; Pete Coors and Ken Salazar get out-of-state money for Colorado primaries; Oregon&#8217;s Ballot Measure 34 would help protect state forests
Arizona elections stay 'clean'
Big business tries to challenge Arizona’s pioneering Clean Elections program, but the public campaign-finance program prevails
Calendar

Book Reviews

Remembering those forgotten in the desert
In his book, The Devil’s Highway, Luis Alberto Urrea tells the tragic story of a group of poor immigrants who tried to get to a better life, and died in the Arizona desert
Mining research tool debuts on Web
The Environmental Working Group has a new Web site, "Who owns the West," which gives users a comprehensive look at mining claims on public lands
Public lands lifeline
Mining claims, hardrock mining, public lands, Environmental Working Group, Western Mining Action Project, Roger Flynn, National Mining Association, Luke Popovich

Heard Around the West

Heard around the West
Pac-O-Art art vending machine; turning against Wal-Mart; Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest; Boy Scouts sued for blaze; ORVers need potty-training; bull elk get really hungry

Letters

Related Stories

Death of the San Pedro: Not if, but when
Groundwater pumping in the Sierra Vista area may be already reducing water flow to the San Pedro River