Magazine
The Wild Card

March 3, 2003

As the Wilderness Act nears its 40th birthday, it takes a new kind of wheeling and dealing to protect wild lands, and there’s no better place to see the new face of the movement than Las Vegas, Nev. Also in this issue: The Border Patrol wants to erect 249 miles of fences along the Arizona-Mexico border, and some environmentalists are worried about their impact on desert wildlife.

Feature

The wild card
As the Wilderness Act nears its 40th birthday, it takes a new kind of wheeling and dealing to protect wild lands, and there’s no better place to see the new face of the movement than Las Vegas, Nev.

Editor's Note

Pure and simple, wilderness is not
Wilderness has never been as simple a thing as it seems in our dreams, and in these days it’s up to all of us to work together – and often compromise – on legislation.

Essays

Get off and walk – wilderness is for wildlife
One mountain-biker and wilderness activist believes there are places where his beloved bike doesn’t belong, and that wilderness is one of them.
Let bikers in, and we’ll stand behind wilderness
Another mountain biker says wilderness activists would get a lot more accomplished if they would give mountain bikes a place in the wilderness.

Dear Friends

Dear friends
February board meeting in wintry Fort Collins, Colo.; thanks for helping our Spreading the News Campaign; we can’t get away with anything (corrections & emendations)

News

Fences go up along the Mexican border
The Border Patrol wants to erect 249 miles of fences along the Arizona-Mexico border, and some environmentalists are worried about their impact on desert wildlife.
The Latest Bounce
New Mexico keeps cockfighting and dogfighting; western sage grouse not listed; too many Mormon handcart pullers in Wyoming; Lake Powell and other reservoirs dropping; and Colorado studies "Big Straw" and "logging for water."
Grasslands take a step toward nature
New management plans for 10 national grasslands in the Dakotas, Wyoming and Nebraska are getting flak from every direction.
Locals fight new railroad
Ranchers, environmentalists and other locals are fighting plans for the largest railroad construction project in a century, which would cross national grasslands in Wyoming and South Dakota.
While America waits for war, the environment suffers
In these duct-tape, Code Orange days, only a small political elite seems to be keeping an eye on the environment.
Land-use laws attacked from all sides
Oregon property-rights activists are working to resurrect the controversial Measure 7, which would more or less destroy the state’s land-use regulations.

Book Reviews

Thank you, readers
Thank you to the supporters of the "Spreading the News Campaign"

Heard Around the West

Heard Around the West
Wyoming funds contraceptives for its coyotes – but not its women

Letters

Cut the anti-immigration rhetoric
Cut the anti-immigration rhetoric
Empower immigrants — don't knock them out
Empower immigrants — don't knock them out
'Baby factories' are the problem
"Baby factories" are the problem
Poverty — and U.S. policy — are the roots of Mexico's problems
Poverty — and U.S. policy — are the roots of Mexico's problems
U.S. is to blame for immigration
U.S. is to blame for immigration

Related Stories

Wilderness on the move
Wilderness on the move
Peaks and valleys: Protected wilderness byyear
Peaks and valleys: Protected wilderness by year
Wilderness provides a ‘safe haven’ for this cowboy
Nevada rancher Cal Baird wants to protect local wild lands as wilderness.
Off-roaders torpedo a wilderness alternative
Emery County Commissioner Randy Johnson thought he could come up with a local alternative for protecting Utah’s San Rafael Swell, but angry ORVers attacked his proposed monument.