Magazine
A breath of fresh air

January 20, 2003

For over 30 years, the Northern Cheyenne have stood firm against energy development and its environmental impacts, but now, faced with crushing poverty, some are starting to think about developing the reservation’s coal and methane resources. Also in this issue: At midnight on New Year’s Eve, Interior Secretary Gale Norton astonished California by it cutting off from the "surplus" Colorado River water it has long been using, after the state failed to come up with promised water transfers.

Feature

A breath of fresh air
For over 30 years, the Northern Cheyenne have stood firm against energy development and its environmental impacts, but now, faced with crushing poverty, some are starting to think about developing the reservation’s coal and methane resources

Essays

A winter drive into oblivion
During a long drive through a Western blizzard, times seems to come to a stop as you wonder whether you will ever make it home – in safety –a gain.
High tea in the wilderness and a toast to the light
Forty women meet in a Montana wilderness to celebrate the solstice with high tea and drink a toast to returning light.

Dear Friends

Dear Friends
A blizzard of mail; keeping us on our toes; more corrections

News

California’s water binge skids to a halt
At midnight on New Year’s Eve, Interior Secretary Gale Norton astonished California by it cutting off from the "surplus" Colorado River water it has long been using, after the state failed to come up with promised water transfers.
The Latest Bounce
Judge rules against Forest Service on New Mexico’s Copper Creek grazing allotment; Clinton’s roadless rule is reinstated; Forest Service ordered to obey Montana Wilderness Study Act; lynx arrive in Colorado for reintroduction and California Fish and Game
Tug-of-war continues over ancient bones
A judge’s ruling giving Kennewick Man’s skeleton to scientists for study rather than to tribes for reburial may actually undermine federal authority over excavation on public lands.
One law, two bodies, two different decisions
In Nevada, the BLM has retained federal ownership of the skeleton of "Spirit Cave Man," preventing both tribal reburial and scientific study of it.
Refuge back in the crosshairs
Republican control of the new Congress may resurrect plans for oil and gas drilling in Alaska’s Arctic Wildlife National Refuge and the National Petroleum Reserve.
84-year-old bird law no match for the military
Congress has exempted the U.S. military from an international law , the 1918 Migratory Bird Treaty Act, in a move environmentalists fear sets a bad precedent.
Virus attacks in the Grand Canyon
Norwalk virus, which attacked cruise ships last fall, also hit rafters in the Grand Canyon, and health consultants and river guides want to avert future outbreaks.
Wild Sky Wilderness could be downsized
As the Wild Sky Wilderness Act goes to Congress this year, supporters fear the Republican-controlled Congress may let the timber industry have a crack at the land, rather than preserving the area in Washington’s Cascade Range.
Wilderness proposal or political ploy?
Environmentalists say the Red Table Mountain Wilderness proposal of Rep. Scott McInnis, R-Colo., is so full of anti-wilderness provisions that it is nothing but a political ploy.

Heard Around the West

Heard Around the West
"Animal racism" against California rats; country-western song titles; dentist makes house call in tree; Phoenix’s Fiesta Bowl; What would Jesus drive?; readers rant in Salt Lake Tribune; wolves in Utah; and junk pile up in Mesa County, Colo.

Letters

THE GREAT RANCHING DEBATE
We all have a dog in grazing fight Ranchers grow good food, strong communities Recreation is more harmful than ranching? It's Marston who ignores science Find common ground on ranching Time to ride into the sunset, Marston Is vegetariani
Stock Farm does help nonprofits
Stock Farm does help nonprofits
Corporate colonizers in the 'last, best place'
Corporate colonizers in the 'last, best place'
HCN misses the mark on gated communities
HCN misses the mark on gated communities
Land-use planning makes Oregon great
Land-use planning makes Oregon great

Related Stories

Tribes gain power through federal environmental laws
Today, 15 tribes manage their own air-quality programs under the federal Clean Air Act
A mine falls, and a tribe may get the shaft
Part of the price of stopping the planned New World Mine near Yellowstone may turn out to be the development of coal reserves along Otter Creek, next to the Northern Cheyenne Reservation