Magazine
River of dreams

September 24, 2001

For 30 years, activists have been working to remove two dams and restore salmon runs on Washington's Elwha River, and now the goal is in sight -- if the money comes through from Congress.

Feature

River of dreams
For 30 years, activists have been working to remove two dams and restore salmon runs on Washington's Elwha River, and now the goal is in sight - if the money comes through from Congress.

Essays

The enduring Endangered Species Act
Former Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt pushed collaboration as a way to save the Endangered Species Act, an approach that has helped to strengthen this strong and flexible law.
In the house of the grizzly
A hunter's close encounter with grizzlies in Wyoming breeds respect for the great bear that is the true lord of the forest.

Dear Friends

Dear Friends
Former HCN intern Karen Mockler and freelancer Mike Stark win journalism war; new interns Erika Trautman and Mason Adams; rabble-rousers and other visitors.
Far from out of it
The terrorist acts of Sept. 11 touched everyone in the HCN office, and some of our friends and families were eyewitnesses.

News

Nature hits a home run for salmon
A rare combination of ideal conditions leads to Idaho's biggest salmon and steelhead runs in 25 years.
State proposes mother-lode mine fee
New Mexico presents Phelps Dodge with a plan that could cost the company $759 billion to close out and clean up its Chino Mine near Silver City, the state's largest.
The Latest Bounce
Utah's Olympics could be cancelled after terrorist acts; 16,000 acres near Scottsdale, AZ reclassified as open space; Idaho's Coeur d'Alene Basin Superfund suit partly resolved; Lewis & Clark bicentennial; retirement age for firefighters raised.
Grand Teton rancher gives up grazing lease
Wyoming rancher Brad Mead gives up his 2,000-acre grazing lease in Grand Teton National Park.
Oak killer on the loose
Sudden oak death, a disease which has killed thousands of native oak trees in Northern California, has appeared in southern Oregon.
Montana guts a green law
Montana greens are worried that recent legislative changes to the state's 1971 Montana Environmental Policy Act will make the law almost impossible to enforce.
The timber sale that won't die
The Eagle Creek timber sale in Mount Hood National Forest near Portland, Ore., is a mecca for protesters, but some say the sale is environmentally sound, and the protests are much ado about nothing.
Klamath water is finally for the birds
Spurred by a lawsuit over the needs of the threatened bald eagle, the Bureau of Reclamation agrees to give some water to six wildlife refuges in the Klamath Basin of Oregon and California.

Heard Around the West

Heard around the West
Fish falls on firefighter; Seattle mansions; drag queens in Idaho Falls; Maroon Bells restroom gets makeover; Albuquerque Mayor Jim Baca vs. opponent's hairdo; Denver Jack-O-Launching; how not to respond to a DUI; Fresno landfill not historic landmark.

Letters

Related Stories

The revival of a river people
Robert Lundahl's new film, "Unconquering the Last Frontier," explores the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe's history with Washington's Elwha River and its salmon.
'Hydro(power) had no friends'
In his own words, Orville Campbell, who spent 30 years working for the companies that own the Elwha dams, talks about the movement to take down those dams.
Lessons for the Colorado
On river trips, Richard Ingebretsen of the Glen Canyon Institute talks about Lake Powell and introduces people to the idea of removing Glen Canyon Dam and resurrecting the Colorado River's drowned canyons.