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for people who care about the West

The wayward West

  Ranchers and farmers in New Mexico are urging New Mexico State University to turn down "tainted" money from the Ted Turner Foundation because the group also funds environmentalists, reports the Associated Press. Russ Miller, general manager of Turner's ranches, reminds the New Mexico Farm and Livestock Board that Turner is a rancher, too. In fact, he is probably New Mexico's biggest rancher; Turner's three ranches make up 1.5 percent of the land in the state ...


An anonymous e-mail communication accuses the Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund of treading on the grassroots reputation of Earthlaw, a Colorado-based environmental public interest law firm, by changing its name to Earth Justice. (SCLDF is often confused with the Sierra Club but although SCLDF represents the club in about half of its cases, the two groups are not connected.) Victor Sher of SCLDF says he will not "dignify that e-mail with a response" and that the name-change will be announced publicly this summer ...


In an apparent attempt to soothe bumbled relations with Utah politicians, President Bill Clinton nominated a Salt Lake City lawyer to head the Bureau of Land Management. If approved by the Senate, Patrick Shea will manage the BLM's 270 million Western acres, including the new Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Clinton also named attorney Kathy Karpan, from mining-dependent Wyoming, as director of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement. Last November, Karpan lost to Republican Mike Enzi in her bid to be Wyoming's senator ...


A letter that "mysteriously got out" has three environmental groups puzzled. Sent May 12, the letter denied their petition to bid on a logging contract if the intent was not to cut the trees down. When contacted, Agriculture Undersecretary James Lyons said, "I don't know how this happened, but the letter does not reflect Clinton administration policy." The letter was signed in Lyons' name by a machine and mailed to the Oregon attorney for the Oregon Natural Resources Council, Northwest Ecosystem Alliance, and the Southwest Center for Biological Diversity ...


No sooner did Colorado pass Amendment 16, giving the state's land board a more environmental focus, than its director, Max Vezzani, quit to run the Soil Conservation Board. Colorado is looking for someone to manage 3 million acres of state trust lands ...


Colorado used to have two papers that circulated statewide: the Rocky Mountain News and the Denver Post. Now only the Post circulates outside the metro counties. But the statewide circulation isn't backed by a statewide staff. Former regional reporter Pat O'Driscoll left the Post to open the Rocky Mountain office of USA Today. Jim Carrier has been reassigned to a business beat. That leaves the paper's third, and last, regional reporter - Kit Miniclier - to cover whatever happens outside of the Denver metro area.





" Heather Abel








Ranchers and farmers in New Mexico are urging New Mexico State University to turn down "tainted" money from the Ted Turner Foundation because the group also funds environmentalists, reports the Associated Press. Russ Miller, general manager of Turner's ranches, reminds the New Mexico Farm and Livestock Board that Turner is a rancher, too. In fact, he is probably New Mexico's biggest rancher; Turner's three ranches make up 1.5 percent of the land in the state ...


An anonymous e-mail communication accuses the Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund of treading on the grassroots reputation of Earthlaw, a Colorado-based environmental public interest law firm, by changing its name to Earth Justice. (SCLDF is often confused with the Sierra Club but although SCLDF represents the club in about half of its cases, the two groups are not connected.) Victor Sher of SCLDF says he will not "dignify that e-mail with a response" and that the name-change will be announced publicly this summer ...


In an apparent attempt to soothe bumbled relations with Utah politicians, President Bill Clinton nominated a Salt Lake City lawyer to head the Bureau of Land Management. If approved by the Senate, Patrick Shea will manage the BLM's 270 million Western acres, including the new Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Clinton also named attorney Kathy Karpan, from mining-dependent Wyoming, as director of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement. Last November, Karpan lost to Republican Mike Enzi in her bid to be Wyoming's senator ...


A letter that "mysteriously got out" has three environmental groups puzzled. Sent May 12, the letter denied their petition to bid on a logging contract if the intent was not to cut the trees down. When contacted, Agriculture Undersecretary James Lyons said, "I don't know how this happened, but the letter does not reflect Clinton administration policy." The letter was signed in Lyons' name by a machine and mailed to the Oregon attorney for the Oregon Natural Resources Council, Northwest Ecosystem Alliance, and the Southwest Center for Biological Diversity ...


No sooner did Colorado pass Amendment 16, giving the state's land board a more environmental focus, than its director, Max Vezzani, quit to run the Soil Conservation Board. Colorado is looking for someone to manage 3 million acres of state trust lands ...


Colorado used to have two papers that circulated statewide: the Rocky Mountain News and the Denver Post. Now only the Post circulates outside the metro counties. But the statewide circulation isn't backed by a statewide staff. Former regional reporter Pat O'Driscoll left the Post to open the Rocky Mountain office of USA Today. Jim Carrier has been reassigned to a business beat. That leaves the paper's third, and last, regional reporter - Kit Miniclier - to cover whatever happens outside of the Denver metro area.





" Heather Abel