Climate Change and the West

Forget Wall Street, focus on the real issues
The urgency of the politicians' response to our economic troubles contrasts with the way we’re ignoring the greater crisis of climate change.
Late aspen, early melting
Informal evidence of a warming climate.
All along the watchtower
Andrew McNair, who works weekends at a computer in Olympia, Wash., is not your typical Western fire watcher.
The wandering lepidopterist
Eric Wagner joins naturalist Robert Michael Pyle on one leg of his first-ever “Big Year” – in which he will try to see as many different butterflies as he possibly can.
Agricultural water pollution on the line
Bush Administration tries again to work around Clean Water Act.
Of parks and particulates
EPA proposes relaxing pollution rules in nation's parks.
We thought we were safe
California fire victim barely escapes
Shifting sands in Navajoland
On the drought-stricken Navajo Nation, scientist Margaret Hiza Redsteer studies the movement of sand dunes.
Climate cash-in
Western farmers and ranchers using progressive land-management techniques can make a few bucks from the new carbon market – but some critics say it won’t lead to any real reduction in carbon emissions.
The West’s wacky weather
The West’s weather is full of surprises this spring, with snowstorms, windstorms, rain and wildfires all happening at the same time.
The mysticism of mud
Ernest Atencio ponders an exceptionally muddy Mud Season in New Mexico, and notes how readily most Westerners forget that we live in an arid landscape.
Climate Revolutionary
Law professor Mary C. Wood wants to use “atmospheric trust litigation” to tackle global warming in the courts.
Up in FLAME
Proposed bill calls for separate "catastrophic wildfire" fund
A hard winter makes you think
Rhonda Claridge describes a hard winter in the high mountains and points out that one seldom-acknowledged effect of climate change could be harder winters in some parts of the world.
A hard winter makes you think
Rhonda Claridge describes a hard winter in the high mountains, and points out that one seldom-acknowledged effect of climate change could be harder winters in some parts of the world.
Two weeks in the West
Nasty chemicals in the Western air; drilling dust; EPA gets tougher on mercury; wildlife agency reconsiders habitat for Canada lynx and protection for sage grouse and white-tailed prairie dogs; and Grand Canyon gets a man-made flood.
Unnatural Preservation
Public-land managers in the era of global warming face uncomfortable choices: Do they intervene to protect dying plants and animals, or stand back and let this new version of “nature” take its course?
Planning for uncertainty
A Phoenix symposium on dealing with drought and global warming echoes the larger uncertainties facing public-land and national park managers throughout the West.
You can’t stop nature
Pepper Trail warns us that we continue to tinker with nature at our peril.
Toxic legacy
Some activists fear that toxic chemicals in a New Mexico landfill, left over from Cold War-era nuclear weapons research, may be creeping toward the Albuquerque Aquifer.