Climate Change and the West

What is poisoning border babies?
Terrible birth defects among newborns in the Lower Rio Grande Valley may be caused by agricultural and industrial pollution, but no one knows for sure.
Trash talk
A new edition of "Rubbish! The Archaeology of Garbage" by William Rathje and Cullen Murphy, reports the fascinating findings of the University of Arizona's "Garbage Project."
Will salt sink an agricultural empire?
Mike Delamore of the Bureau of Reclamation is trying to solve what seems an impossible problem: draining the salt building up on California's farmland while protecting water quality in the San Francisco Bay Delta.
Pollution pickle sours landowner
Cleaning up asbestos-laden soil around a warehouse owned by the Minot, N.D., Park District may cost the district a lot, with the previous owner long gone and the source of the asbestos, W.R. Grace, now bankrupt.
All's fair in smog and waste?
A new Web site created by the Oakland, Calif., nonprofit Environmental Defense gathers information about environmental and health dangers in any community in the U.S.
The smog is lifting
After decades of cleanup efforts, Denver, Colo., is about to receive clean-air status from the Environmental Protection Agency.
New dump may trash Tacoma's water
Local critics worry that a new landfill may pollute drinking water used by Eatonville and Tacoma, Wash.
Texaco spill leaves residents fuming
Some citizens of Sunburst, Mont., feel that Texaco has not done enough to clean up an underground gasoline pool left from a toxic spill 46 years ago.
Drought drains the West
A look at the weather throughout the West shows lower-than-usual snowpacks and a lot of drought, making life hard for farmers and fish, and leading to fears of another fierce wildfire season.
Company leaves victims in its dust
In Libby, Mont., residents who are sick or dying of exposure to asbestos from W.R. Grace's vermiculite mine are outraged by the company's decision to file for bankruptcy in the face of their lawsuits.
I am an Inuit warrior
It's not easy being a person who lives in a high mountain ski town but hates snow and winter weather.
Will Western skies be clear enough?
The Western Regional Air Partnership has a plan to clear the air over the Colorado Plateau, but critics say the plan is much too soft and likely to prove ineffective.
Cement glues citizens together
Pueblo, Colo., citizens, who worked for years to restore air and water polluted by their city's one-time steel mills, now fear a planned cement manufacturing plant will make their newly livable community unlivable and polluted once again.
Composting takes out the trash
California has cut its landfill waste by 40 percent, and some give composting the credit.
Dumping diesel
Southern California is trying to reduce diesel emissions by turning to cleaner-burning energy sources for public vehicles.
Los Alamos races against time
In the wake of the Cerro Grande fire, Los Alamos faces a new problem: how to prevent summer rainstorms from flooding the fire-denuded canyons and washing the laboratory's hazardous wastes into the Rio Grande.
Mining tops toxic list
Hardrock mining tops the list of industrial polluters in the EPA's annual Toxics Release Inventory.
Western weather waffles
A look at this last winter in the West shows snow in the Northwest and Sierra Nevada, variable weather in the Rockies, and what looks like the beginning of a long, hot, dry summer in the Southwest.
Boss must pay for poisoning employee
In a precedent-setting case, Allan Elias is convicted of "knowing endangerment" for exposing employee Scott Dominguez to cyanide in an accident that damaged his nervous system.
Cooling the waters
The EPA orders the Potlatch Corp. pulp mill in Lewiston, Idaho, to cool its wastewater and reduce its pollution of the Snake River.