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Shooting yourself in the foot--literally

COLORADO AND THE WEST

The western Colorado town of Nucla only has about 730 residents, but its council is eager to tell them how to live -- only in the name of freedom, of course, and to protect the Second Amendment. Recently, that meant telling residents that they must own a gun. There were loopholes: Heads of households who didn't want to buy a gun or who couldn't legally own one could opt out, which seemed to remove the ammo from the ordinance. And short of going door to door, how would the town dads know if their gun law was being obeyed? As one commenter put it in the Denver Post, "Enough with the governments' intrusions in our lives!" Another reader suggested that Nucla would be much smarter requiring ownership of an elephant: "Nothing like a good elephant on your side in the event of trouble with unwanted intruders."

It's hard to deny that guns occasionally cause unfortunate accidents, even when nobody else is around. In Colorado Springs recently, a man who was having a drink or two -- while also cleaning his gun -- shot his own left index finger, reports the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel.

And in Missoula, Mont., a custodian at the University of Montana was "examining one of his weapons when it fired and the bullet hit him in the foot," reports the Missoulian. He had two other guns and a knife stored in his janitor's closet in case he wanted to examine them as well.

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CALIFORNIA: Coming in for a landing. Courtesy Eric Dugan.

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