You are here: home   Departments   Ray Ring

Ray Ring

  • The buzz business

    The problem of controlling Africanized bees is now widespread, and some are taking advantage of the frightening invasion to earn a good living.

  • Wolves still struggle in the Southwest

    Restoring Mexican wolves to the Southwest has met more resistance than the restoration of wolves in the Northern Rockies.

  • 'There isn't much room for more wolves'

    Ralph Maughan, professor of political science at Idaho State University, and president-elect of the Wolf Recovery Foundation, blames conflicts on not enough room in the wild for wolves.

  • 'I respect wolves. I still don't like them killing oursheep.'

    In her own words, Margaret Soulen Hinson explains that wolf predation is minimal compared to other animals that kill her family's sheep.

  • Wolf at the door

    Wolves have been restored in the Northern Rockies, but their conflict with civilization now prompts wildlife managers to face some agonizing decisions about the animal's future.

  • Water threat inspires a rare alliance

    Two proposed power plants in Post Falls, Idaho, have locals, business leaders and environmentalists coming together to block what could have a detrimental effect on the drinking water for more than 400,000 people in northern Idaho and eastern Washington.

  • Winter-use plan lurches toward the finish line

    The National Park Service has issued its Winter-Use Plans Draft Supplemental EIS, the agency's first attempt to manage winter traffic in Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks.

  • Cleaner machines drive (slowly) toward Yellowstone

    The Environmental Protection Agency is developing the first emission standards for off-road motors, including snowmobiles.

  • Move over! Will snowmobile tourism relax its grip on a gateway town?

    In West Yellowstone, Mont., where snowmobile tourism is a mainstay of the economy, locals are split between fierce supporters of the industry and those who favor a little more quiet and a measure of control.

  • Westerners share a different reality

    A "time" magazine column about satellite radio that described the New Jersey Turnpike as "the middle of nowhere" provides unintentional humor to Westerners who know the real meaning of nowhere.

  • Greens join 'Let's derail a judge' game

    Environmentalists adopt the conservative strategy of working to derail the nomination of federal judges whom they fear could harm their cause.

  • Cheney picks former aide to oversee parks, BLM,wildlife

    The Bush administration picks Wyoming resident Paul Hoffman to run the BLM as assistant secretary of the Interior for fish, wildlife and parks.

  • Judge puts kibosh on logging plan

    A federal judge rules that the Burn Area Recovery Plan, which would log Montana's Bitterroot National Forest, must be put on hold until the Forest Service gives the public a chance to appeal.

  • How to influence Congress on just dollars a day

    Activist Ray Wheeler sets an intense pace as he personally lobbies in D.C. for wilderness preservation in Utah.

  • Ranchers' group adopts practical strategy

    The Northern Plains Resource Council is unique among Montana environmental groups in that it was founded by cattle ranchers, who still make up half the membership.

  • 'We better start moving ahead'

    In his own words, Libby, Mont., accountant Wayne Hirst talks about how Montana environmentalists went wrong.

  • 'We don't rest ... on economics'

    In his own words, activist Bob Decker talks about Montana's environmental groups and the struggle they face in their state.

  • Bad moon rising

    Back in the '70s, Montana led the way in progressive environmental legislation, but now with its economy faltering, those laws are being eviscerated, and environmentalists need to find a new strategy.

  • In the heart of the New West, the sheep win one

    The Hispanic livestock cooperative, Ganados del Valle, wins a lawsuit against the Sierra Club Foundation in New Mexico's Chama Valley.

  • Ranchers sour on Canadian gas plant

    Alberta, Canada, ranchers are frustrated by the government's lack of oversight of the proliferating sour-gas plants that some say harm health and livestock.

Email Newsletter

The West in your Inbox

Follow Us

Follow us on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter! Follow our RSS feeds!
  1. The death of backpacking? | Younger people don’t seem interested in this out...
  2. A graceful gazelle becomes a pest | Inrroducing an African gazelle called the oryx for...
  3. What's killing the Yukon's salmon? | An ecological mystery in Alaska has scientists and...
  4. Plains sense | Ten years after Frank and Deborah Popper first pro...
  5. Salmon go down the tubes – literally | Washington biologists test pressurized tubes to tr...
HCN Classifieds
Subscriber Alert
 
© 2014 High Country News, all rights reserved. | privacy policy | terms of use | powered by Plone