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  • Travel, HCN-style

    Travel, HCN-style

    Editor’s note for HCN’s second annual special issue on travel in the West describes some quirky personal trips.

  • A sampler of U.S. environmentalists working in British Columbia

    A sampler of U.S. environmentalists working in British Columbia

    U.S. environmental groups like Rivers Without Borders, Conservation Northwest and Round River Conservation Studies work with First Nations in British Columbia to slow a mining rush.

  • A different borderland blues

    A different borderland blues

    Mining in British Columbia could have big impacts on parts of Canada -- and the U.S.

  • A bird in hand

    A bird in hand

    Will the soul of wildlife biology survive in an era of remote monitoring technology?

  • A sampler of wildlife tech

    A sampler of wildlife tech

    The gadgets we attach to wild animals and fish include radio transmitters, microchips, acoustic tags, geolocators and accelerometers.

  • Protecting the forests, and maybe the deserts, too

    Protecting the forests, and maybe the deserts, too

    Environmentalists are trying to buy out oil and gas leases in national forests, including the Wyoming Range and Thompson Creek Divide, while the drillers often have their way in the desert and sagebrush.

  • Voters shape energy policy by choosing utility regulators

    Voters shape energy policy by choosing utility regulators

    Races for seats on state commissions that oversee utilities are among the most important elections you’ve never heard of. They could decide the future of renewable energy in Montana and Arizona this year.

  • Is the Latino electorate finally beginning to make its mark?

    Is the Latino electorate finally beginning to make its mark?

    If Democrats succeed in an improbable coup -- winning a U.S. Senate seat in Arizona, and making the state competitive for Obama -- they’ll have Latino voters to thank.

  • In Montana, 'Dr. Trout' battles the planet's most dangerous diseases

    In Montana, 'Dr. Trout' battles the planet's most dangerous diseases

    Marshall Bloom, who heads up disease research at the Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Mont., discusses his work on deadly viruses and his passion for conservation.

  • Rehberg and Tester: Policy differences

    Rehberg and Tester: Policy differences

    A list of some of Republican Rep. Denny Rehberg's major policy differences with incumbent Democratic Sen. Jon Tester.

  • Who is Denny Rehberg, really?

    Who is Denny Rehberg, really?

    Republican Rep. Denny Rehberg has exploited his family's long Montana history to get where he is today, but his current campaign for Democrat Jon Tester's Senate seat is raising questions about his record and that history.

  • Old West versus New West in Taos, N.M.

    Old West versus New West in Taos, N.M.

    When wandering newcomers and deep-rooted old-timers collide in the West, it gets difficult, especially in a place as culturally complex as northern New Mexico.

  • Coal-export schemes ignite unusual opposition, from Wyoming to India

    Coal-export schemes ignite unusual opposition, from Wyoming to India

    Ambitious schemes to build railroads and ports to ship Powder River Basin coal abroad will bring pollution and traffic to communities along the transport path, who are rising up in protest.

  • Three days in western Nevada

    Three days in western Nevada

    A lot of places call themselves "gateway cities," but Reno, Nev., is truly the gateway to a lot of strange and amazingly gorgeous places.

  • Calling for a crackdown on polygamous crime

    Calling for a crackdown on polygamous crime

    Crimes committed by a fundamentalist sect on the Utah-Arizona border needs to be seriously investigated by both the Mormon Church and those states.

  • If corporations are people, what are they really like?

    If corporations are people, what are they really like?

    The state of Montana is leading the way in the fight to destroy the bizarre legal fiction that corporations are people.

  • How conservation works south of the border

    How conservation works south of the border

    Maps, photos and text describe some of the federal and private, nonprofit work in Northwest Mexico to preserve imperiled landscapes and a rich diversity of plants and animals.

  • Mexico’s conservationists keep fighting the good fight

    Mexico’s conservationists keep fighting the good fight

    Despite a constant lack of money and the threat of drug-cartel violence, dedicated border conservationists work to preserve the landscape they love.

  • High Country News welcomes new interns

    High Country News welcomes new interns

    High Country News welcomes new interns Danielle Venton and Neil LaRubbio; Marian Lyman Kirst is our new editorial fellow; and correction to captive wolves story.

  • Billboard corporations use money and influence to override your vote

    Billboard corporations use money and influence to override your vote

    In Salt Lake City and other Western communities, billboard companies battle local democracy by fighting attempts to regulate the giant signs.

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