You are here: home   Departments   News

News

  • Luxury looms over Moab

    Some Moab, Utah, residents are fighting a luxury resort and development called Cloudrock that developers want to build on a state-owned mesa south of town.

  • Salmon feel the heat

    The Army Corps of Engineers has been ordered to come up with a plan to lower salmon-endangering high temperatures and gas content in the Snake River.

  • Two laws collide in the Northwest woods

    Stimson Lumber Company says the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act entitles it to build at least 21 miles of new road through endangered species habitat in the Selkirk Range of Idaho and Washington.

  • Forest supervisor faces down oil drilling

    Kniffy Hamilton, supervisor of Bridger-Teton National Forest, Wyo., has issued a draft environmental impact statement that would not allow oil and gas drilling on land near the Gros Ventre Wilderness.

  • Parks test skiers' green resolve

    In Wyoming, backcountry skiers are upset to find that the Park Service's decision to ban snowmobiles from Yellowstone and Grand Teton may also ban skiing in some areas, to protect bighorn sheep.

  • Farmworkers reap a minimum wage

    A new law means that Idaho farmworkers will be entitled to receive a minimum wage for their labors.

  • Republicans undermine a bedrock environmentallaw

    Gayla Benefield of Libby, Mont., is among many fighting to keep the Montana Environmental Policy Act intact in the face of Republican attempts to weaken the far-reaching and powerful law.

  • The Latest Bounce

    Griles nominated deputy Interior Sec'y; Mont. Gov. Judy Martz wants state to get 5,000 federal acres; pumice mining in San Francisco Peaks, AZ, ends; Sen. Craig Thomas' bill would repeal Yellowstone's snowmobile ban; N.M. keeps cockfighting legal.

  • U.S. mills fall under Canadian ax

    In the new global economy, U.S. sawmills are going out of business, unable to compete with cheap timber coming from Canada, where environmental regulations are much looser.

  • Yellowstone's last stampede

    A visit to Yellowstone in winter leads to encounters with park employees eager for (and snowmobilers vehemently against) the coming banishment of snowmobiles from the national park.

  • Washington, unplugged

    With the Bonneville Power Administration saying that it can't meet demand over the next five years, Washington's Gov. Gary Locke has announced a plan to encourage energy efficiency, conservation and diversification.

  • Last stand for a roadside attraction

    Cody, Wyo., historian Bob Edgar fears that his Old Trail Town, a "virtual" frontier settlement created using relocated historic buildings and cabins, is threatened by the city's plan to buy and develop nearby open space.

  • Fiddling with FERC

    Environmentalists say a bill intended to speed up the dam relicensing process at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission might lead to inadequate environmental assessments.

  • Colorado program axed

    The Colorado Natural Areas Program, which has been cataloging rare animal and plant habitat and geological and fossil-rich formations, may end this summer when its state funding dries up.

  • Downwinders fight for their due

    Protesters in Salt Lake City charge that the federal government has yet to fully compensate people in Utah, Nevada and Idaho whose health was harmed by the nuclear-bomb testing that started 50 years ago.

  • Wetlands get dumped on

    A Supreme Court decision has stripped federal protection from about one-third of the nation's wetlands.

  • Back on the bus

    Grand Canyon's plan to cut traffic in the park by building a light-rail train system has been derailed because of its cost, and the park has been told to use buses instead.

  • Navajos at odds about marinas

    Some Navajos fear the tribe's planned Antelope Point Marina in Arizona will harm archaeological and ceremonial sites.

  • Suburban sprawl hits tribal land

    The tribes of the Tulalip Indian Reservation, Wash., alarmed by sprawling development, have made an agreement with the county to preserve reservation land, but some say it isn't strong enough.

  • The latest bounce

    Analyzing election's growth-related measures; Gale Norton will keep new monuments, with some changes; agencies ordered to study antelope in Ariz.; tentative agreement on Jarbidge River road in Utah; Pueblo activists fight proposed cement plant.

Email Newsletter

The West in your Inbox

Follow Us

Follow us on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter! Follow our RSS feeds!
  1. The death of backpacking? | Younger people don’t seem interested in this out...
  2. Why I am a Tea Party member |
  3. The privatization of public campground management | All the info you need to decide whether you love o...
  4. Efficiency lessons from Germany |
  5. The Latest: Interior commits to restoring bison on select lands | The “odd ungulate out” gets a tentative win.
  1. The death of backpacking? | Younger people don’t seem interested in this out...
  2. A graceful gazelle becomes a pest | Inrroducing an African gazelle called the oryx for...
  3. What's killing the Yukon's salmon? | An ecological mystery in Alaska has scientists and...
  4. Plains sense | Ten years after Frank and Deborah Popper first pro...
  5. North Dakota wrestles with radioactive oilfield waste | Regulators look at raising the limit for radiation...
HCN Classifieds
Subscriber Alert
 
© 2014 High Country News, all rights reserved. | privacy policy | terms of use | powered by Plone