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  • Islands hung out to dry

    Idaho irrigators are relieved that water rights have been denied for the 94 islands in the Snake River that make up the Deer Flats National Wildlife Refuge.

  • Slapping back at SLAPPs

    A bill designed to protect citizens from frivolous lawsuits called SLAPPs (Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation) was defeated in Colorado's state Senate, but its sponsor plans to try again.

  • Debate roars over quiet canyon

    Environmentalists say new rules restricting helicopter and airplane flights in the Grand Canyon still aren't enough to restore quiet, even as air-tour operators react with anger and lawsuits.

  • Company leaves victims in its dust

    In Libby, Mont., residents who are sick or dying of exposure to asbestos from W.R. Grace's vermiculite mine are outraged by the company's decision to file for bankruptcy in the face of their lawsuits.

  • Microwaveable wilderness

    Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility and Wilderness Watch are challenging a microwave repeater tower in Death Valley National Park that was put up without any environmental assessment.

  • Monument status could wreck ruins

    Archaeologists fear that without more funds to manage tourism, the ruins in newly designated Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, Colo., will suffer from increased visitors.

  • The latest bounce

    Idaho can't kill sage grouse predators; Colo. coyote-killing study stopped; Craig Thomas (R-Wyo.) against drilling on public land near Jackson; Interior/Treasury must account for lost Indian monies; Sen. Slade Gorton may become federal judge.

  • Roadless rule hits the skids

    The Bush administration is working to revise and weaken Clinton's roadless area conservation rules for national forests.

  • Monuments caught in the crosshairs

    Under the new administration of George W. Bush, Republicans seek to open Clinton's new national monuments to oil and gas exploration and other uses and to revise the way monuments are created.

  • An unabashed moralist bows out

    Longtime, controversial New Mexico activist Sam Hitt retires from Forest Guardians to write a book.

  • How green is this growth?

    Local critics are working to stop a much-touted "model" development planned for the Ahmanson Ranch on the edge of Southern California's Santa Monica Mountains.

  • New Mexico loggers get 'police power'

    In New Mexico, environmentalists are aghast at a new law, approved by legislators of both parties, that gives counties 'police power' to cut trees in national forests threatened by fire.

  • Montana gets a taste of old-time logging

    Critics say a massive salvage-logging operation in the wildfire-burned Sula State Forest, Mont., won't leave enough snags and downed trees for wildlife and forest rejuvenation.

  • End of a dam saga

    Jim Trees plans to replace a 140-year-old diversion dam in a Zion National Park wilderness study area with an "environmentally friendly" weir just outside the park boundary.

  • Green power threatens the Black Rock

    Some critics say a proposed geothermal power plant threatens the newly designated Black Rock Desert-High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trails National Conservation Area in northwestern Nevada.

  • The latest bounce

    Forest Service Chief Mike Dombeck resigns; Northern Rockies' spring mushroom boom; Yosemite's public bus system; new protection for California deserts; wolves may move to Utah.

  • Republicans launch counteroffensive

    Environmentalists are reeling from the Bush administration's rollbacks of many of Clinton's laws and policies affecting water quality, mining, endangered salmon and national forests.

  • The tale of a salmon slinger

    On a tributary of Oregon's Nehalem River, the writer worked with Fish and Wildlife biologist Michele Long to scatter the carcasses of hatchery salmon, which feed a wide range of wildlife.

  • Demonstrating for the delta

    The Glen Canyon Action Network toured part of the West to promote basic conservation measures for the Colorado River, along with a proposal to send 1 percent of the river's water downstream to restore the delta.

  • The environmental movement is a-muddle

    Conservation organizations and activists are suddenly feeling lost and lonely in Washington, D.C., in the new, anti-environmental world of George W. Bush and friends.

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