You are here: home   Departments   News

News

  • New Mexico loggers get 'police power'

    In New Mexico, environmentalists are aghast at a new law, approved by legislators of both parties, that gives counties 'police power' to cut trees in national forests threatened by fire.

  • Montana gets a taste of old-time logging

    Critics say a massive salvage-logging operation in the wildfire-burned Sula State Forest, Mont., won't leave enough snags and downed trees for wildlife and forest rejuvenation.

  • End of a dam saga

    Jim Trees plans to replace a 140-year-old diversion dam in a Zion National Park wilderness study area with an "environmentally friendly" weir just outside the park boundary.

  • Green power threatens the Black Rock

    Some critics say a proposed geothermal power plant threatens the newly designated Black Rock Desert-High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trails National Conservation Area in northwestern Nevada.

  • The latest bounce

    Forest Service Chief Mike Dombeck resigns; Northern Rockies' spring mushroom boom; Yosemite's public bus system; new protection for California deserts; wolves may move to Utah.

  • Republicans launch counteroffensive

    Environmentalists are reeling from the Bush administration's rollbacks of many of Clinton's laws and policies affecting water quality, mining, endangered salmon and national forests.

  • The tale of a salmon slinger

    On a tributary of Oregon's Nehalem River, the writer worked with Fish and Wildlife biologist Michele Long to scatter the carcasses of hatchery salmon, which feed a wide range of wildlife.

  • Demonstrating for the delta

    The Glen Canyon Action Network toured part of the West to promote basic conservation measures for the Colorado River, along with a proposal to send 1 percent of the river's water downstream to restore the delta.

  • The environmental movement is a-muddle

    Conservation organizations and activists are suddenly feeling lost and lonely in Washington, D.C., in the new, anti-environmental world of George W. Bush and friends.

  • Luxury looms over Moab

    Some Moab, Utah, residents are fighting a luxury resort and development called Cloudrock that developers want to build on a state-owned mesa south of town.

  • Salmon feel the heat

    The Army Corps of Engineers has been ordered to come up with a plan to lower salmon-endangering high temperatures and gas content in the Snake River.

  • Two laws collide in the Northwest woods

    Stimson Lumber Company says the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act entitles it to build at least 21 miles of new road through endangered species habitat in the Selkirk Range of Idaho and Washington.

  • Forest supervisor faces down oil drilling

    Kniffy Hamilton, supervisor of Bridger-Teton National Forest, Wyo., has issued a draft environmental impact statement that would not allow oil and gas drilling on land near the Gros Ventre Wilderness.

  • Parks test skiers' green resolve

    In Wyoming, backcountry skiers are upset to find that the Park Service's decision to ban snowmobiles from Yellowstone and Grand Teton may also ban skiing in some areas, to protect bighorn sheep.

  • Farmworkers reap a minimum wage

    A new law means that Idaho farmworkers will be entitled to receive a minimum wage for their labors.

  • Republicans undermine a bedrock environmentallaw

    Gayla Benefield of Libby, Mont., is among many fighting to keep the Montana Environmental Policy Act intact in the face of Republican attempts to weaken the far-reaching and powerful law.

  • The Latest Bounce

    Griles nominated deputy Interior Sec'y; Mont. Gov. Judy Martz wants state to get 5,000 federal acres; pumice mining in San Francisco Peaks, AZ, ends; Sen. Craig Thomas' bill would repeal Yellowstone's snowmobile ban; N.M. keeps cockfighting legal.

  • U.S. mills fall under Canadian ax

    In the new global economy, U.S. sawmills are going out of business, unable to compete with cheap timber coming from Canada, where environmental regulations are much looser.

  • Yellowstone's last stampede

    A visit to Yellowstone in winter leads to encounters with park employees eager for (and snowmobilers vehemently against) the coming banishment of snowmobiles from the national park.

  • Washington, unplugged

    With the Bonneville Power Administration saying that it can't meet demand over the next five years, Washington's Gov. Gary Locke has announced a plan to encourage energy efficiency, conservation and diversification.

Email Newsletter

The West in your Inbox

Follow Us

Follow us on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter! Follow our RSS feeds!
  1. Idaho’s sewer system is the Snake River | As Big Ag flourishes, this massive waterway suffer...
  2. The Latest: Wild Mexican wolf pups born in Sierra Madre | The species still struggles on both sides of the b...
  3. Recreation-related death toll soars this summer |
  4. Summer swimming in a Washington lake | A writer takes the plunge in frigid water.
  5. Colorado water users gird for first statewide plan |
  1. The death of backpacking? | Younger people don’t seem interested in this out...
  2. Idaho’s sewer system is the Snake River | As Big Ag flourishes, this massive waterway suffer...
  3. A graceful gazelle becomes a pest | Inrroducing an African gazelle called the oryx for...
  4. Illegal immigrants take jobs from Americans | A native-born New Mexico Hispanic points out that ...
  5. Plains sense | Ten years after Frank and Deborah Popper first pro...
HCN Classifieds
Subscriber Alert
 
© 2014 High Country News, all rights reserved. | privacy policy | terms of use | powered by Plone