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  • A seminal sprawl fight ends in compromise

    A six-year fight over the Canoa Ranch south of Tucson ended in compromise, with development to take place but 4,800 acres of open space to be preserved.

  • Politics sink growth management

    Colorado is no closer to managing its growth problems after a ballot initiative failed and a dozen legislative bills crashed into a partisan impasse.

  • Indian rock art under the drill?

    Crow Indians fear that rock art will be opened up to vandalism if Anschutz Exploration Co. drills an exploratory oil well and upgrades an access road in Montana's Weatherman Draw.

  • Arizona waffles on wolves

    The Arizona Game and Fish Commission wants to pull the plug on Mexican wolf reintroduction.

  • Tribe tussles over target range

    The Assiniboine and Gros Ventre tribes on the Fort Belknap reservation in Montana are split on the Montana Air National Guard's proposal to drop dummy bombs on tribal trust land.

  • University wolf study raises hackles

    The Utah Farm Bureau Federation is angry at University of Utah professor Robert Schmidt, whose class recently studied the biological and economic effects of a hypothetical wolf population in the state.

  • Jeffords proves the West is part of the USA

    The power shift in the Senate caused by John Jeffords' exit from the GOP won't turn the world upside-down but does rock it, as Western conservatives suddenly lose chairmanship of committees.

  • Montana shock jock stokes the fires of fear

    In Kalispell, Mont., "shock jock" John Stokes owns radio station KGEZ and uses it as a platform for his virulent, far-right attacks on environmentalism and other issues.

  • The Latest Bounce

    Fran Mainella tapped to head NPS; Bruce Babbitt and Ahmanson Ranch, Calif.; firefighters needed for summer; Rosebud Sioux can't prevent hog farm; family buys 80 percent of Salt Lake Tribune to keep Deseret News from taking it over.

  • Surprise! Boise votes for open space

    In conservative Idaho, Boise residents vote to tax themselves to conserve open space and stave off sprawl in the foothills.

  • Will the Grand Staircase suffer shrinkage?

    Rep. Jim Hansen, R-Utah, is eager to create a new national monument to protect dinosaur tracks near St. George, Utah, but to pay for it he wants to dissolve two-thirds of the existing Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.

  • California monument welcomes cattle

    Environmentalists, ranchers and land managers are arguing over the future of cattle grazing on the newly designated Carrizo Plain National monument in California, where the BLM has long relied on cattle to help control weeds.

  • Lake Coeur d'Alene at stake

    The Coeur d'Alene Tribe and the State of Idaho are fighting in the Supreme Court over Lake Coeur d'Alene, with the tribe claiming partial ownership of the lake under a 19th century treaty.

  • Jackson Hole takes aim at helicopter tours

    The Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance is fighting the commercial helicopter tours over Teton County, Wyo., planned for this summer, but it faces an uphill battle.

  • An energy plan as solid as natural gas

    President Bush's much-heralded energy plan is extremely vague, but its vagueness may be the document's strong point, the writer opines.

  • Takings legislation cracks Oregon's greenfoundation

    Oregon's Measure 7, a recently passed ballot initiative requiring state and county to pay landowners when regulations affect property values, may threaten the famously green land-use codes, which have protected the state from sprawl.

  • The Latest Bounce

    Fallout from Jeffords' party switch; Las Vegas' wastewater poisoning Lake Mead fish; Green party may lose major-party status in N.M.; snowmobile manufacturers fight Park Service ban; Colorado land swap killed.

  • Energy plan eyes the Rockies

    Environmentalists and land managers are girding their loins to deal with President Bush's energy policy, which calls for more drilling, pipelines, power plants and power lines on Western public lands.

  • Dogs to sniff out grizzly numbers

    Zoology professor David Wasser uses dogs to sniff out bear scat in Washington's North Cascade Mountains to help determine how many grizzly bears live there.

  • Tortoises take on tanks

    A proposed expansion of the Army's National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., in the Mojave Desert could harm the endangered Lane Mountain milkvetch and the threatened desert tortoise.

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