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  • Go west, fruit picker

    Disappearing jobs in the hard-hit apple orchards of eastern Washington have led to a flood of displaced migrant workers moving west toward Seattle.

  • A struggling mountain town looks for a lift

    The former mining town of Silverton, Colo., has put its economic hopes in plans for a new but old-fashioned small-scale, low-key ski area, but some worry the area is too avalanche-prone to be safe.

  • Cooperating on the Valles Caldera

    The Valles Caldera National Preserve in northern New Mexico will not be managed by any government agency, but by a president-appointed board of nine trustees, who are still trying to figure out their new job.

  • Church aims to purchase public land

    The Mormon Church is working to purchase a national historic site along the Oregon Trail in Wyoming, where nearly 200 Mormon pioneers died in the winter of 1856.

  • Stargazers defend darkness in Arizona

    The Flagstaff Dark Skies Coalition's struggle to keep the stars visible has led to the city's designation as the first "International Dark-Sky City."

  • The Latest Bounce

    Sierra Nevada Framework upheld; Rebecca Watson, Interior Dept., land and minerals mgmt; lawsuit on president's authority to create new monuments dismissed; Bureau of Indian Trust Assets Mgmt.; Torres-Martinez Band of Cahuilla Indians, Salton Sea.

  • Ruling ripples through salmon country

    A judge's ruling has removed Oregon coastal coho from protection under the Endangered Species Act, and sent the National Marine Fisheries Service scrambling to rethink its hatchery policy.

  • Rocky Mountain Front saved again - but...

    An industry suit is rejected, upholding - at least for the moment - former Forest Service Supervisor Gloria Flora's ban on drilling in Montana's Rocky Mountain Front.

  • Mining reform gets the shaft

    Environmentalists say the Interior Department yanked the teeth from Bruce Babbitt's new set of hard-rock mining regulations when it decided to go with a much-watered-down version.

  • Will the circle be broken?

    The state of Washington is considering logging circles of land set aside in 1997 as habitat for endangered spotted owls.

  • Savage controversy peacefully resolved

    An Oregon irrigation district has agreed to breach the Savage Rapids Dam on the Rogue River.

  • Bonneville trout denied protection

    For the third time, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has refused to grant the Bonneville cutthroat trout a place on the endangered species list.

  • Cows to heat homes

    In Oregon's Willamette Valley, electricity for 65 homes will be produced from "bio-gas" from the manure of 400 Holstein cows.

  • Will salt sink an agricultural empire?

    Mike Delamore of the Bureau of Reclamation is trying to solve what seems an impossible problem: draining the salt building up on California's farmland while protecting water quality in the San Francisco Bay Delta.

  • Pollution pickle sours landowner

    Cleaning up asbestos-laden soil around a warehouse owned by the Minot, N.D., Park District may cost the district a lot, with the previous owner long gone and the source of the asbestos, W.R. Grace, now bankrupt.

  • Nuclear storage site splinters Goshutes

    A proposed high-level nuclear waste storage area on the Skull Valley Goshute Reservation in western Utah is coming under attack from some tribal critics as well as other opponents.

  • Resort counties push for legal workers

    The Rural Resort Region, a coalition of five Colorado counties, is pressing for a new guest-worker program to legitimize the immigrant workers needed by their resorts.

  • Global market squeezes sheep ranchers

    Foreign competition, low prices and increasing labor costs have sent the U.S. sheep industry into a decline that is felt especially in Idaho.

  • Homeland security drafts rangers

    Western public-land rangers are being pulled from their regular jobs and reassigned back East, guarding federal buildings in Washington, D.C., and serving as temporary sky marshals.

  • The Latest Bounce

    Cheap Canadian lumber imports; Jack Blackwell regional forester in CA; Biologist Gene Schoonveld fears research spread CWD; ELF bombs BLM wild horse facility near Susanville, CA; Colo. voters derail monorail proposal.

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