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  • Report slams BLM's land-exchange process

    A new report criticizes the BLM's handing of land swaps, saying the process is "politicized" and results in the loss of federal money and natural resources

  • Silver state gets a little wilder

    A new bill designates 450,000 acres of wilderness in Nevada, but makes it easier for Las Vegas to grow by withdrawing other land from wilderness consideration

  • Feds bail on snowmobile ban

    The National Park Service gives up on trying to ban snowmobiles from Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks

  • Election Bounce

    Most green initiatives fail in West; a few bright spots; "Indian vote" helped Sen. Tim Johnson, D-S.D., but not George Cordova in Arizona; Sen. Wayle Allard, R, re-elected in Colorado; Dems gain 11 seats in Idaho; Northwest keeps to status quo

  • Conservation vote groups optimistic

    Ed Zuckerman of the Federation of State Voter Conservation Leagues says environmentalists should not despair over the recent elections, because grassroots conservation groups did very well at the local level

  • Wind power in the West gains speed

    Colorado writer Alex Merkels talks about the revolution in wind power now sweeping over the West.

  • Golden State gets a green power surge

    Under a new law, California's three investor-owned utilities must buy 20 percent of their power from alternative energy sources such as wind and solar.

  • How to make your own Yellowstone, Mexican style

    In Coahuila, Mexico, the corporate colossus CEMEX is working to create a "Mexican Yellowstone" that would preserve the rich wildlife and wild country of the Sierra El Carmen.

  • Land swap too hot to handle

    Some Sheridan, Wyo., residents fear a planned land swap could land them with responsibility for an underground coal-seam fire at the Welch Ranch on the Tongue River.

  • Golden trout swimming in troubled waters

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is considering whether to list the disappearing golden trout, California's state fish, as endangered.

  • Corps stands behind status quo

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says that, because of drought, changing the management of the Missouri River and its dams to benefit endangered fish and birds must be postponed.

  • Navajos can't Dine at local diner

    RD's Drive-In in Page, Ariz., is facing a federal lawsuit over its policy of not allowing Navajo employees to speak their native language while at work.

  • Wild horses could go to Mexico

    Rancher Merle Edsall wants to save wild horses by sending them to a sanctuary in Sonora, Mexico, but some fear such a move would actually endanger the animals.

  • Grand Canyon oases face faraway threats

    Small desert springs in the Grand Canyon area are indispensable oases for many plants and animals, but they may be endangered by development many miles away as the groundwater is depleted.

  • The Latest Bounce

    Whistleblower says Fisheries Service followed politics, not science; decision to release water for the silvery minnow is reversed; Farmers get money for destroyed crops; Report says Bush admin. acted improperly when it overturned environmental regs.

  • Washington citizens fight to save aging Hanford reactor

    In Hanford, Wash., a local group, the Citizens for Medical Isotopes, wants to convert the Fast Flux Test Facility into a private facility producing medical isotopes.

  • Feds find shortcuts in nuclear cleanup

    The Department of Energy is looking for shortcuts in the cleanup of radioactive waste at the Hanford bomb factory in Washington, but area tribes and environmentalists fear the job may not be properly done.

  • Judges rule gas leases are illegal

    Three judges say the BLM illegally leased coalbed methane rights in Wyoming's Powder River Basin without evaluating impacts - a ruling environmentalists say could affect similar leases across the West.

  • Bush's war on terrorism comes West

    Some locals are worried about plans to expand the Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Mont., into a "biosafety 4" facility capable of handling the kind of deadly microbes likely to be used in bioterrorist attacks against the U.S.

  • Nuclear dump may be supersized

    Eight years before it is likely to open, the planned nuclear waste dump in Nevada's Yucca Mountain already appears to be full - and the amount of nuclear waste around the country in need of a home continues to grow.

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