You are here: home   Departments   News

News

  • Ranching conference secrets revealed!

    The landmark conference "Ranching West of the 100th Meridian" is now available on four videotapes.

  • Wild tiles

    To celebrate its purchase and renovation of the historic Roxy Theater in Missoula, Mont., the International Wildlife Film Festival is displaying 300 hand-painted ceramic tiles by artist Melanie Jeffs, each representing a donation.

  • Logging for water creates a buzz

    In Colorado, a long-dead notion to clear-cut forests to increase water runoff is resurrected in a time of drought.

  • Budget cuts bury paleontologists

    The new superintendent of Dinosaur National Monument in Jensen, Utah, plans to cut nine positions in the paleontology department and hand over future scientific work to private contractors, much to the outrage of the scientific community.

  • Wayward wolf nabbed in Utah

    "Wolf No. 253," from the Druid Peak Pack in Yellowstone’s Lamar Valley, is caught far from home when he steps into a leghold coyote trap, 30 miles northeast of Salt Lake City, Utah.

  • Northwest braces itself for wolves

    Unconfirmed wolf sightings in Oregon are on the rise, and wolf advocates are arguing with ranchers over how to handle the return of the predator packs.

  • The Latest Bounce

    New Mexico and the Navajo Nation tackle cattle rustling; details of Vice President Dick Cheney’s Energy Plan won’t be released; "anaerobic digester" in the works to clean up hog-farm waste; Imperial Valley farmers refuse to sell water to San Diego, Calif.

  • Forest planning gets a facelift

    The Forest Service has announced a major overhaul of the forest planning process that some fear may cut out both environmental oversight and public involvement, and lead to even more legal gridlock.

  • Fish and wildlife have rights, too

    Montana’s Supreme Court rules that citizens and government agencies can maintain water rights without "using" the water, while the Wyoming Legislature stalls over a bill that would allow irrigators to leave water instream temporarily.

  • Klamath water worth more in river

    A U.S. Geological Survey study, suppressed by the Interior Department in October, says that recreation adds more than agriculture to the economy of the Klamath River Basin.

  • Condit Dam removal hits snags

    Plans to take down Condit Dam on the White Salmon River in Washington are stalled over the problem of what to do about the sediment that has backed up behind the dam.

  • Cowboys fight oil and gas drillers

    Fed up with energy companies and the BLM, several ranchers in northwestern New Mexico have locked their gates, blocking private roads to natural gas wells.

  • Farmers band together to stave off sprawl

    In California’s Central Valley, farmers are working together to create "farmland security perimeters" to protect their land from development.

  • Election Bounce

    Beef checkoff rule upheld by courts; California red-legged frog loses critical habitat; Hanford’s Fast Flux Test Facility will not be shut down; Neal McCaleb announces resignation as director of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and EPA eases rules on coal-fir

  • Outside the agency, it’s a cold, cruelworld

    Displaced federal employees may find it difficult to adapt to work in the private sector.

  • Administration, industry stamp out clean airregs

    The auto industry, backed by the Bush administration, is trying to halt California’s progressive auto-emissions regulations.

  • Colorado community battles a toxic shipment

    Residents of the Canon City, Colo., suburb of Lincoln Park are fighting the proposed delivery of radioactive soil from a New Jersey Superfund site to the Cotter Corp. uranium mill

  • New ski resort goes big

    The luxurious WestRock Resort is now under construction, 90 miles north of Boise, despite continued opposition from environmentalist and citizens' groups

  • Did the BLM Spike New Mexico's ditches?

    Herbicide spread by BLM land managers on range near Malaga, N.M., has washed into the Black River, contaminating a diversion ditch and killing nearby farmers' crops and trees

  • Clinton-era monuments weather court challenge

    A federal court rules that Pres. Clinton did, in fact, have the authority to create six national monuments in four Western states

Email Newsletter

The West in your Inbox

Follow Us

Follow us on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter! Follow our RSS feeds!
  1. Idaho’s sewer system is the Snake River | As Big Ag flourishes, this massive waterway suffer...
  2. Closure of federal sheep facility would be a victory for grizzlies |
  3. The Latest: Wild Mexican wolf pups born in Sierra Madre | The species still struggles on both sides of the b...
  4. Recreation-related death toll soars this summer |
  5. Summer swimming in a Washington lake | A writer takes the plunge in frigid water.
  1. The death of backpacking? | Younger people don’t seem interested in this out...
  2. Idaho’s sewer system is the Snake River | As Big Ag flourishes, this massive waterway suffer...
  3. A graceful gazelle becomes a pest | Inrroducing an African gazelle called the oryx for...
  4. Illegal immigrants take jobs from Americans | A native-born New Mexico Hispanic points out that ...
  5. Plains sense | Ten years after Frank and Deborah Popper first pro...
HCN Classifieds
Subscriber Alert
 
© 2014 High Country News, all rights reserved. | privacy policy | terms of use | powered by Plone