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  • Pesky pike persist

    Exotic pike have reappeared in California's Lake Davis, just 18 months after the lake was poisoned in a controversial plan, and now the state is considering underwater explosions to keep the pike from heading downstream.

  • A price tag for protest

    The Oregon Department of Forestry wants to charge protesters for timber that can't be cut in forests such as the Tillamook, where tree-sitting activists have held longtime protests.

  • Quincy collaboration heads to court

    The Quincy Library Group plans a lawsuit to challenge the Sierra Nevada Framework, which the group says has "killed" its own collaborative plan for national forest management.

  • A crowded Washington wilderness gets ugly

    Activist Martha Hall accuses area outfitters of trashing northern Washington's Pasayten Wilderness, which has been discovered and overrun by recreationists.

  • GAO drops a bomb on Yucca Mountain

    A General Accounting Office audit recommends that Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham wait several years to make a decision on the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste dump, until studies are complete and serious questions answered.

  • Protecting Arizona's underground wonderland

    Arizona State Parks is fighting a proposal resort near Benson, Ariz., which some fear could harm the nearby Kartchner Caverns.

  • The Latest Bounce

    ANWR drilling plan derailed in Congress; four dams on Lower Snake won't be breached; Montana game rancher Lew Wallace says he'll shoot his elk; Rocky Flats cleanup hits South Carolina roadblock; lawless Thanksgiving in Imperial Sand Dunes, Calif.

  • Gold may bury tribe's path to its past

    The Quechan tribe is fighting the Bush administration's revival of a controversial mine in California's southern Mojave Desert, where Glamis Gold Ltd. plans to mine gold on a site sacred to the tribe.

  • Shrinking salmon

    As salmon runs in the Northwest diminish, the size of individual fish decreases too.

  • How to go with the flow

    Montana Audubon has written an eight-page guide to flood preparation, called Go With the Flow: Streams and Bank Stabilization.

  • Ranching conference secrets revealed!

    The landmark conference "Ranching West of the 100th Meridian" is now available on four videotapes.

  • Wild tiles

    To celebrate its purchase and renovation of the historic Roxy Theater in Missoula, Mont., the International Wildlife Film Festival is displaying 300 hand-painted ceramic tiles by artist Melanie Jeffs, each representing a donation.

  • Logging for water creates a buzz

    In Colorado, a long-dead notion to clear-cut forests to increase water runoff is resurrected in a time of drought.

  • Budget cuts bury paleontologists

    The new superintendent of Dinosaur National Monument in Jensen, Utah, plans to cut nine positions in the paleontology department and hand over future scientific work to private contractors, much to the outrage of the scientific community.

  • Wayward wolf nabbed in Utah

    "Wolf No. 253," from the Druid Peak Pack in Yellowstone’s Lamar Valley, is caught far from home when he steps into a leghold coyote trap, 30 miles northeast of Salt Lake City, Utah.

  • Northwest braces itself for wolves

    Unconfirmed wolf sightings in Oregon are on the rise, and wolf advocates are arguing with ranchers over how to handle the return of the predator packs.

  • The Latest Bounce

    New Mexico and the Navajo Nation tackle cattle rustling; details of Vice President Dick Cheney’s Energy Plan won’t be released; "anaerobic digester" in the works to clean up hog-farm waste; Imperial Valley farmers refuse to sell water to San Diego, Calif.

  • Forest planning gets a facelift

    The Forest Service has announced a major overhaul of the forest planning process that some fear may cut out both environmental oversight and public involvement, and lead to even more legal gridlock.

  • Fish and wildlife have rights, too

    Montana’s Supreme Court rules that citizens and government agencies can maintain water rights without "using" the water, while the Wyoming Legislature stalls over a bill that would allow irrigators to leave water instream temporarily.

  • Klamath water worth more in river

    A U.S. Geological Survey study, suppressed by the Interior Department in October, says that recreation adds more than agriculture to the economy of the Klamath River Basin.

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