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  • Property rights reined in

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled April 23 that property owners at Lake Tahoe are not entitled to compensation for a moratorium in 1981 on new building that was created to protect Lake Tahoe's blue waters from erosion runoff.

  • Does desert cross cross the line?

    A cross placed on Mojave National Preserve by Veterans of Foreign Wars as a memorial is the center of controversy between the National Park Service and the American Civil Liberties Union, which claims it violates the separation of church and state.

  • Griz ordered to get scarce

    Several communities surrounding Yellowstone National Park have passed regulations banning grizzlies, wolves and other "unacceptable species," even though the laws are unenforceable.

  • Bush will edit NW Forest Plan

    The Bush administration aims to overhaul the Clinton-bred forestry plan, and environmentalists pledge to oppose efforts to dilute it.

  • Are Wyoming's feedgrounds a hotbed of disease?

    Conservation groups want to phase out 23 elk feedgrounds managed by the state, claiming they are expensive breeding grounds for disease.

  • The Latest Bounce

    Off-roaders in the Mojave Desert must yield to desert tortoises; BLM reverses its ban on four-wheelers in California's Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area; Forest Service denies Boy Scout camp on White River Forest near Aspen; Forest Service cancels Eagle

  • Wilted West staggers into summer

    The fourth year of a crippling drought throughout the West is potential for trouble, not only for farmers, but wildlife and the human population, as well.

  • Zion's geriatric cottonwoods

    Cottonwood trees in Utah's Zion National Park may vanish in the next few decades, according to a study by the park and the Grand Canyon Trust that recommends removal of flood-protection stone levees as a way to save the trees.

  • Elk and deer disease could waste Western Slope

    Despite efforts by the Colorado Division of Wildlife to control it, chronic wasting disease, the fatal brain malady in elk and deer, has spread to two illegally penned wild deer near Craig, Colo.

  • Land exchange could short-change monuments

    A land-exchange referendum on the November ballot might shift the borders of the Sonoran Desert and Ironwoods national monuments, designated by President Clinton before he left office, in an effort to resolve power companies' rights-of-way.

  • City gets in the zone for fish

    The city of Portland, Ore., drafts a proposal to aid endangered fish through building and landscape regulations to prevent eroding stream banks on 19,000 acres of residential property.

  • Fashion faux-pas in the forest

    Designer Ralph Lauren's proposal to swap land with the U.S. Forest Service near Ridgway, Colo., has caused a stir among neighbors, who claim the new public road would disrupt wildlife, create forest fires and bring vehicles closer to wilderness.

  • Silver Valley residents sue for damages

    A class-action lawsuit could force five former mining companies to pay for a medical monitoring program detecting health effects from lead and arsenic contamination for 100,000 people in the Coeur d'Alene Basin.

  • Habitat protection takes a critical hit

    Lawsuits filed by angry developers have forced the federal government to re-examine the Endangered Species Act of 1978 regarding critical habitat.

  • The Latest Bounce

    Forest Service revokes its approval of Rock Creek Mine in Montana; Nevada's fight against Yucca Mountain may be doomed; ARCO will pay $87 million to treat toxic water in Butte, Mont.'s Berkeley Pit; deadline approaches to ban Jet Skis in national parks; A

  • Water threat inspires a rare alliance

    Two proposed power plants in Post Falls, Idaho, have locals, business leaders and environmentalists coming together to block what could have a detrimental effect on the drinking water for more than 400,000 people in northern Idaho and eastern Washington.

  • Evicted terns get new habitat

    In an effort to help endangered salmon on the Columbia River, Caspian terns that prey on the fish are being lured to different habitat.

  • Campaign finance reform may boost grass roots

    The campaign finance reform bill sponsored by John McCain and Russell Feingold won't solve everything, but it may give grassroots environmental groups a bit of an edge in future political battles.

  • Snowy plover predators become prey

    On the coast of Oregon, federal agencies have decided to start poisoning and killing the predators that steal the eggs of endangered snowy plovers.

  • A road through a national monument?

    In New Mexico, Albuquerque's new mayor, Martin Chavez, has renewed support for building a controversial road through Petroglyph National Monument.

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