You are here: home   Departments   News

News

  • White River Forest plan friend to all - and to none

    The final management plan for Colorado's White River National Forest has conservationists, recreationists and water users all complaining about it.

  • A wide-angled wilderness

    The proposed Wild Sky Wilderness Area northeast of Seattle could be a model for future wilderness designations, based on its diversity of tourism-based opportunities along with good environmental stewardship.

  • Can green-certified lumber make it?

    Some foresters who are using responsible environmental practices in order to be "green-certified" are disappointed by the lack of return for their admirable efforts.

  • Mount Hood recreation may go big time

    Friends of Mount Hood is fighting the Mount Hood Meadows Development Corp., which wants to build a ski resort that threatens pear orchards and cattle ranches on the northeastern flanks of Oregon's Mount Hood.

  • Columbia dredging closer

    The National Marine Fisheries Service has again changed its opinion and will allow the Army Corps of Engineers to begin dredging the Columbia River, despite environmentalists' concerns about the wild salmon.

  • Bomb blasting goes bust

    Following a lawsuit by a coalition of Indian tribes, environmental groups and private citizens, the Sierra Army Depot has stopped burning and blasting old munitions near Herlong, Calif., and is looking to burn and blast elsewhere.

  • Growth boundary grows

    The growth boundary to limit sprawl on Colorado's Front Range, originated five years ago by concerned business leaders, developers and government officials, has been revised periodically to accommodate more growth, which critics say defeats the purpose.

  • Is this wilderness perverted?

    Utah Rep. Jim Hansen proposes half a million acres of wilderness in western Utah, but in the same amendment would dump hazardous waste in the nearby Skull Valley Goshute Reservation.

  • Temporary protection yanked in the Siskiyou

    Protection for wildlife in the Siskiyou National Forest is gone now that BLM and USFS have reopened 90 percent of lands to new mining claims before environmental studies are completed.

  • The Latest Bounce

    Zuni Indians worry about NM's Fence Lake coal mine; Santa Clara Pueblo's Black Mesa golf course; Trophy Mtn. Elk Ranch in northern Colo. restocks after slaughter from chronic wasting disease; Wyo. moves forward to manage wolves.

  • Earth First!er Judi Bari avenged at last

    A federal court jury on June 11 found FBI agents and Oakland police guilty of framing Earth First! activists Darryl Cherney and the late Judi Bari, accusing them of knowingly possessing the car bomb that exploded, injuring Bari, as part of their fight aga

  • Exotic-killing herbicide is ousted from the range

    In its attempt to eradicate cheatgrass in Idaho, the BLM contaminated crops with the herbicide, Oust, which led to a lawsuit stopping the spraying, while the weed continues to spread.

  • Interior's conflicting interests

    Deputy Interior Secretary J. Steven Griles is accused by environmentalists of conflict of interest in his encouragement of coalbed-methane drilling in the Powder River Basin.

  • Duwamish? Duwamish who?

    The Duwamish Tribe, seeking federal recognition, has been rebuked by the Bush administration, due to a technical glitch in paper work by the outgoing Bureau of Indian Affairs director.

  • No magic bullet for wasting disease

    Controlling the spread of Chronic Wasting Disease in deer and elk has developed into a major problem for Department of Wildlife officials in Colorado, with critics appalled at the agency's slaughter of the animals.

  • The Latest Bounce

    Boise, Idaho, open space; BLM to auction cattle near Elko, Nev.; DOJ intervenes in W.R. Grace's asbestos disaster bankruptcy in Libby, MT; ATV trail in Utah to be named after Rep. Jim Hansen.

  • Permanent user fees in the pipeline

    The Bush administration wants to permanently install user fees for recreation on public lands, but opponents are speaking out.

  • Congress goes barmy over the Army

    Congress spends little time examining military requests before giving the OK, even when it comes to training in areas that affect wildlife or destroy ecosystems.

  • Singing cowboys strike a bad chord

    The Bar-K Wranglers, a group of singing cowboys who planned to open a dinner theater in Oakley, were turned down by the Planning Commission, due to wetlands, moose habitat, and financial questions.

  • Small towns court upscale tourists

    A small, former silver-mining town in the Rockies offers tourists cultural experience with the Creede Repertory Theater, turning the town into a bustling arts community.

Email Newsletter

The West in your Inbox

Follow Us

Follow us on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter! Follow our RSS feeds!
  1. The death of backpacking? | Younger people don’t seem interested in this out...
  2. A graceful gazelle becomes a pest | Inrroducing an African gazelle called the oryx for...
  3. What's killing the Yukon's salmon? | An ecological mystery in Alaska has scientists and...
  4. Plains sense | Ten years after Frank and Deborah Popper first pro...
  5. North Dakota wrestles with radioactive oilfield waste | Regulators look at raising the limit for radiation...
HCN Classifieds
Subscriber Alert
 
© 2014 High Country News, all rights reserved. | privacy policy | terms of use | powered by Plone